Category: Dean Freeman

Dean Freeman Addresses Challenge to Capitalism in WSJ

December 2nd, 2013 in Dean Freeman, News

The Wall Street Journal‘s online portal “The Experts,” which features video chats and short online posts from an exclusive group of industry and thought leaders, posed this question to Allen Questrom Professor and Dean Ken Freeman: What will be the biggest challenge to capitalism in the next two decades—and what should be done about it?

Dean Freeman considers the world in his response:

Accepting that there are a number of different varieties of “capitalism,” not just the American way. This will be difficult at a time when most Americans still do not have a passport, and have not visited countries outside of its borders. An economic revolution is taking place from China to Singapore to Nigeria to Brazil combining the best elements of the American way with local needs.

We need to learn from and respect each other’s form of capitalism so that all have the opportunity to flourish.

View “The Experts” post here.

Dean Freeman Tells CEOs in WSJ: Prepare Your Company for Upheavals

November 26th, 2013 in Dean Freeman, News

The Wall Street Journal‘s online portal “The Experts,” which features video chats and short online posts from an exclusive group of industry and thought leaders, asked Allen Questrom Professor and Dean Ken Freeman: What one question would you want to pose to leading chief executive officers?

He poses his question with the future (and necessary anticipation of it) in mind:

What are you doing to prepare your employees and your company for the next disruptive change?

Create a culture of transparency, openness, and collaboration, to be able to anticipate and then recognize disruption when it happens. Reward risk-taking and creativity, so that you can address disruptive challenges quickly and effectively. Get outside the four walls (real or virtual) of the company to gain insights from the marketplace. Do so, or sell your shares.

View “The Experts” post here.

Dean’s Speaker Series: Kenneth Feld (SMG’70), Feld Entertainment

October 26th, 2013 in Alumni, Dean's Speaker Series, Lifelong Learning, News

On October 26, 2013, in conversation with Dean Freeman, CEO of Feld Entertainment Kenneth Feld (SMG’70) spoke about what it takes to make an impact on the worldwide stage. Feld advised the audience to put family before business and to know that, sometimes, one learns more from what doesn’t go right.

Boston University School of Management’s Dean’s Speaker Series brings industry leaders into its “living room” for insightful conversation with Dean Freeman. The various speakers, by tapping into their personal experience, provide advice on how to become a successful leader, implement an effective talent management system, guide an organization through a technological transformation, and more.

Dean’s Speaker Series: Deb Dugan, CEO of (RED)

October 26th, 2013 in Dean's Speaker Series, Lifelong Learning, News

CEO of (RED) Deb Dugan is leading the global fight to end AIDS, and on October 26, 2013, she sat down with Dean Freeman for a discussion on guiding an organization through a 21st-century transformation. Dugan purposely keeps (RED) provocative, aiming to take smart risks and make creative connections. She recognizes the importance of remaining steadfast in one’s vision, but flexible in the approach.

Boston University School of Management’s Dean’s Speaker Series brings industry leaders into its “living room” for insightful conversation with Dean Freeman. The various speakers, by tapping into their personal experience, provide advice on how to become a successful leader, implement an effective talent management system, guide an organization through a technological transformation, and more.

Dean’s Speaker Series: IBM’s CIO Jeanette Horan (GSM’93) and Mike Wright, CIO at McKinsey & Co.

October 25th, 2013 in Alumni, Dean's Speaker Series, Lifelong Learning, News

On October 25, 2013, N. Venkatraman, the David J. McGrath, Jr. Professor in Management at Boston University School of Management, led a discussion with VP and CIO of IBM Jeanette Horan (GSM’93) and Global CIO for McKinsey & Co. Mike Wright. The pair shared their thoughts on digital entrepreneurship, how technology plays a role in connecting with one’s staff, and having the confidence to do what excites you.

Boston University School of Management’s Dean’s Speaker Series brings industry leaders into its “living room” for insightful conversation with Dean Freeman. The various speakers, by tapping into their personal experience, provide advice on how to become a successful leader, implement an effective talent management system, guide an organization through a technological transformation, and more.

Dean’s Speaker Series: Warren Bennis, “The Father of Leadership”

October 24th, 2013 in Dean's Speaker Series, Lifelong Learning, News

Known as the “Father of Leadership” and Boston University School of Management’s most famous professor, Warren Bennis spoke with Dean Freeman on October 24, 2013, via videoconferencing. The Pulitzer Prize nominee recalled his time at BU SMG, as well as discussed the art form that is leadership.

Boston University School of Management’s Dean’s Speaker Series brings industry leaders into its “living room” for insightful conversation with Dean Freeman. The various speakers, by tapping into their personal experience, provide advice on how to become a successful leader, implement an effective talent management system, guide an organization through a technological transformation, and more.

Dean Freeman in Wall Street Journal: Companies Are Wasting Money on Social Media

October 23rd, 2013 in Dean Freeman, News

“The Experts,” the Wall Street Journal‘s online portal that features video chats and short online posts from an exclusive group of industry and thought leaders, posed this question to Allen Questrom Professor and Dean Ken Freeman: What’s the biggest mistake companies make with social media?

Dean Freeman states that many companies jump on the “social media bandwagon” without a strategy or outcome metrics in place, which often spawns wasteful spending. According to an August 2013 survey of Chief Marketing Officers, he notes, only 15% have seen proven quantitative impact from their social media marketing expenditures, and yet, the same CMOs expect to double social media spending in the next five years. Dean Freeman strategizes:

Social media impacts consumer behavior. In the short term, a series of consumer attitudinal responses such as awareness, consideration, liking and intention gradually move consumers along the purchase funnel. It is possible for brands to trace these steps on the path to purchase on social media by monitoring when people start conversing, become fans or followers, become engaged, share content, etc. Unless firms improve their metrics and marketing analytics to obtain better forecasts on long-term brand performance by tracing these intermediate customer mind-set metrics and ultimately use them to pin down a clear social media strategy, the use of social media will only be a me-too play for some of them.

In the long term, Dean Freeman says, aiming for a more authentic dialogue with one’s audience is crucial as well. Rather than manipulate the message being sent out, communicate with consumers organically. This will build their trust and their loyalty to the brand.

View the Dean’s response here.

Conversations with Ken: S.H. Lee, Chairman of Homeplus

October 17th, 2013 in Conversations with Ken, News

Transforming Retail in a Digital World

S.H. Lee, Homeplus Chairman
On October 16, 2013, the Chairman of Homeplus, one of Korea’s largest retailers and a branch of global leader Tesco, spoke with Dean Freeman about the future of online shopping and the importance of corporate social responsibility. Through impressive innovation, Seung-han Lee and his team are stepping into the future by implementing the world’s first virtual stores.

Dean’s Speaker Series: S.H. Lee, Chairman of Homeplus

October 16th, 2013 in Dean's Speaker Series, Lifelong Learning, News

On October 16, 2013, the Chairman of Homeplus, one of Korea’s largest retailers and a branch of global leader Tesco, spoke with Dean Freeman about the future of online shopping and the importance of corporate social responsibility. Through impressive innovation, Seung-han Lee and his team are stepping into the future by implementing the world’s first virtual stores.

Boston University School of Management’s Dean’s Speaker Series brings industry leaders into its “living room” for insightful conversation with Dean Freeman. The various speakers, by tapping into their personal experience, provide advice on how to become a successful leader, implement an effective talent management system, guide an organization through a technological transformation, and more.

Dean Freeman Says Technology Is Failing Student Assessments

October 11th, 2013 in Dean Freeman, News, Students

Dean’s thoughts featured in Wall Street Journal‘s “The Experts”

Once again joining the conversation on “The Experts,” the Wall Street Journal‘s online portal that hosts video chats and short online posts from an exclusive group of industry and thought leaders, Dean Freeman responded to the prompt: What technological innovation would you like to see in the classroom?

Dean Freeman focused on innovating the individual student’s classroom experience, noting the difference in learning and retention rates among students—and the lack of attention paid to them. He says in the post:

Innovations that help personalize the individual student’s classroom experience.

The conventional classroom experience is based on the premise that all students learn at the same pace and in the same way. Professors enter class, lecture (or engage in a case discussion) and then leave, only to return to teach the next topic. Today there are not any robust technologies that allow a professor to assess how much each student in the classroom has retained from a session, where a student is struggling or where he or she already has a grasp and could, therefore, benefit from a more accelerated pace.

Innovations that provide individualized diagnostic ability immediately aggregated into performance dashboards (for example, electronic quizzes administered in class to test understanding) will enable professors in real-time to assess the level of comprehension and to identify those who might need more attention.

View the Dean’s response here.