Category: Dean Freeman

Dean’s Speaker Series: David Cote, CEO of Honeywell

October 10th, 2013 in Dean's Speaker Series, Lifelong Learning, News

Chief Executive’s “2013 CEO of the Year” David Cote visited Boston University School of Management on October 10, 2013, for a conversation on making connections—with customers and his fellow Honeywell staff. Cote’s new behavior-based talent management system, known as “One Hon,” is inspiring and creating future CEOs of the Year.

Boston University School of Management’s Dean’s Speaker Series brings industry leaders into its “living room” for insightful conversation with Dean Freeman. The various speakers, by tapping into their personal experience, provide advice on how to become a successful leader, implement an effective talent management system, guide an organization through a technological transformation, and more.

Dean Freeman in Wall Street Journal: Why Companies Aren’t Getting Grads With the Skills They Need

October 9th, 2013 in Career Related, Dean Freeman, News, Students

Dean answers question of preparation in “The Experts”

The Wall Street Journal‘s online portal “The Experts,” which features video chats and short online posts from an exclusive group of industry and thought leaders, posted a response from Dean Freeman to the question: Companies often complain they aren’t getting graduates with the skills they need. Why is that—and what should be done about it?

Dean Freeman explains that higher education has its roots in the industrial revolution and prepares students for a world that no longer exists. He says:

Traditional universities were designed to produce many “copies” of certain types of people—teachers, doctors, lawyers, engineers, etc.—who, after “charging” their batteries with knowledge, would staff specific positions of industrial societies and would remain there throughout their careers.

Today’s world is very different. As technology develops ever more rapidly, any given body of “knowledge” has an increasingly shorter life span. Information technology automates more and more professions, destroying traditional jobs in entire industries.

Freeman continues, stating that individual flexibility, creativity, and certain personality traits like passion, curiosity, and common sense are keys to success in today’s world. The problem, he finds, is that these “soft skills” are not taught in most universities.

However, companies themselves can make an impact, Freeman says. He suggests that they establish partnerships with universities to help prepare graduates for the workplace:

The traditional heavily researched historical case studies that are at the heart of many business schools syllabi must evolve to include real time “live” dialogue on real business issues both inside the classroom with company executives, and outside the classroom through consulting assignments, research projects, case competitions and internships.

Read Dean Freeman’s full post here.

Boston University School of Management’s MBA Program 44th in US on Forbes List

October 9th, 2013 in Academic Programs, Dean Freeman, MBA, News, Press Release, Rankings

The ranking represents a 17-spot jump for the School

Boston University School of Management’s MBA program rose 17 places to rank 44th among US schools on Forbes’ list of “The Best Business Schools.” This increase is the second largest gain of any ranked school.

This is Forbes’ eighth biennial ranking and is based on a formula that considers the return on investment for completing an MBA program. Using information from the class of 2008, Forbes compared alumni salaries upon entry to the MBA program, at graduation, and salary growth over the next five years. This information was then combined with the opportunity cost of pursing the MBA, including forgone salary and tuition, to determine a student’s return on their investment in an MBA education.

“Graduates of the class of 2008 were able to advance their careers upon completing the MBA program despite facing a harsh economic environment,” said Kenneth W. Freeman, Allen Questrom Professor and Dean. “Today’s leaders face disruption and transformation, and SMG develops graduates who are ready to tackle these issues, drive change, and lead.”

As the School celebrates its centennial, it continues to foster innovation across the MBA program, launching an enhanced curriculum in fall 2013. The new curriculum both exposes students to key forces transforming the global economy and provides for deeper disciplinary learning opportunities.

See Forbes‘ full story and list of rankings here.

Conversations with Ken: Bill Erbey, Chairman of Ocwen Financial, Altisource Portfolio Solutions, and Home Loan Servicing Solutions

September 30th, 2013 in Conversations with Ken, News

Bill Erbey, Chairman of Ocwen Financial, Altisource Portfolio Solutions, and Home Loan Servicing Solutions
On September 30, 2013, Dean Freeman sat down with a man who has two companies on Fortune’s 100 Fastest Growing Companies list. Bill Erbey, Chairman of Ocwen Financial, Altisource Portfolio Solutions, and Home Loan Servicing Solutions, finds that strategy—finding the company’s unique competitive advantage—is the key to rising above “me too” businesses.

Dean’s Speaker Series: Bill Erbey, Chairman of Ocwen Financial, Altisource Portfolio Solutions, and Home Loan Servicing Solutions

September 30th, 2013 in Dean's Speaker Series, Lifelong Learning, News

On September 30, 2013, Dean Freeman sat down with a man who has two companies on Fortune’s 100 Fastest Growing Companies list. Bill Erbey, Chairman of Ocwen Financial, Altisource Portfolio Solutions, and Home Loan Servicing Solutions, finds that strategy—finding the company’s unique competitive advantage—is the key to rising above “me too” businesses.

Boston University School of Management’s Dean’s Speaker Series brings industry leaders into its “living room” for insightful conversation with Dean Freeman. The various speakers, by tapping into their personal experience, provide advice on how to become a successful leader, implement an effective talent management system, guide an organization through a technological transformation, and more.

Conversations with Ken: Philip Clarke, CEO of Tesco

September 20th, 2013 in Conversations with Ken, Dean Freeman, News

How the world’s 3rd largest retailer is transforming retail in a digital world.

Philip Clarke, CEO of Tesco
The CEO of the world’s 3rd largest retailer, Tesco, joined Dean Freeman on September 19, 2013, for a conversation on transforming a company during a digital revolution. Philip Clarke touched on topics like remaining a genuine leader, keeping actions consistent with values, and how to approach ethical dilemmas.

Dean’s Speaker Series: Philip Clarke, CEO of Tesco

September 19th, 2013 in Dean's Speaker Series, Lifelong Learning, News

The CEO of the world’s 3rd largest retailer, Tesco, joined Dean Freeman on September 19, 2013, for a conversation on transforming a company during a digital revolution. Philip Clarke touched on topics like remaining a genuine leader, keeping actions consistent with values, and how to approach ethical dilemmas.

Boston University School of Management’s Dean’s Speaker Series brings industry leaders into its “living room” for insightful conversation with Dean Freeman. The various speakers, by tapping into their personal experience, provide advice on how to become a successful leader, implement an effective talent management system, guide an organization through a technological transformation, and more.

Conversations with Ken: David Barger, CEO of JetBlue

April 25th, 2013 in Conversations with Ken, Dean Freeman, News

David Barger, President and CEO, JetBlue
Watch Ken Freeman, Allen Questrom Professor and Dean at Boston University School of Management, as he interviews David Barger, President and CEO of JetBlue. Barger discusses his personal leadership philosophy, the evolving definition of business in society, and JetBlue’s charge to bring humanity back to air travel.

JetBlue CEO David Barger Visited SMG to Talk Airlines, Aspirations

April 10th, 2013 in Dean's Speaker Series, News, School

Tells students: “Don’t take the first job that comes along”

Excerpts from BU Today:

David Barger, JetBlue president and CEO, liberally mixed humor and candor throughout an hour-long discussion last week at the School of Management about JetBlue’s success in an airline industry replete with bankruptcy, mergers, and acquisitions.

Barger was greeted by a standing-room-only crowd for the SMG Dean’s Speaker Series, where he and Kenneth Freeman, SMG’s Allen Questrom Professor and Dean, discussed Barger’s career path, his leadership style, and the future of airlines. Students were invited to ask questions during the second half of the session, and two lucky participants earned a pair of free tickets.

In a nod to the packed room, Freeman remarked, “We have full capacity utilization, which is great in the airline industry.”

Barger, who helped found JetBlue 14 years ago, was the latest guest in the speaker series, which has brought to campus industry stars like Adam Bryant, New York Times senior editor for features, Ed Weiss, general counsel of the Boston Red Sox and Fenway Sports Group, and Dannon CEO Gustavo Valle.

The open secret to JetBlue’s success isn’t strong financials or having the best seats or airfares—although the company has them, Barger said. “At the end of the day, that can all be replicated,” he said. “It does come down to the human equation. It’s our frontline crew members who are making the difference.”

When Freeman opened the discussion to students, some wanted to know about the industry’s future (expect better in-flight entertainment, faster check-in, and satellite-based cockpit navigation), his day-to-day life (“Do you want people to leave the room now?”), and his most beneficial college experience (his political science courses at the University of Michigan).

But on the tip of everyone’s tongue was: what advice does Barger have for job seekers?

“Don’t take the first thing that comes along,” he said. “Look for places that stretch you, if you want to be stretched. Make sure that they stretch you.”

Read the full article on BU Today.

Photos by Kalman Zabarsky via BU Today

Wall Street Journal Features Dean Freeman in “The Experts”

March 13th, 2013 in Dean Freeman, News

Dean joins exclusive group of thought leaders tapped for in-depth online discussions

The Wall Street Journal recently launched an online portal called The Experts, an “exclusive group of industry and thought leaders who will engage in in-depth online discussions” through video chats and short online posts in response to timely questions.

Fellow featured thought leaders include Siemens CEO Eric Spiegel, Professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter of Harvard Business School, and Bernard Yeung, Dean of the National University of Singapore Business School.

Dean Freeman recently responded to the question, “What do you see as the most important thing leaders can do to spur innovation at their institutions?

Leaders need to make it acceptable for employees to challenge the status quo in their companies. We very often become so committed to sustaining our current book of business that we consider activities that are not directly linked to it to be a distraction. Create skunk works to enable creativity and new ideas. Provide seed funding and protection for those that think unconventionally. Reward failure and learn from it.

Dean Freeman also weighed in on the query, “Do you think companies spend too much money hiring ‘superstar’ CEOS from outside their ranks?

The issue isn’t about cost, it is about capability. The board’s primary role is selection and evaluation of the CEO. Each company situation and each CEO is different. Providing a one-size-fits-all solution as suggested by the study makes no practical sense. Lack of talent is a common complaint in virtually every company. Every board should ensure that a strong pipeline of internal candidates for CEO succession is in place, and at the same time consider external candidates when it is time to put a new CEO in the role.  Select the candidate with the best collection of skills to perform the role, keeping in mind that we know much more about the leadership characteristics of internal candidates than those coming in from the outside, even those that are viewed as “rock stars.” Pay competitively in every instance, keeping a singular focus on the CEO that has the highest probability of successfully creating long-term value. The performance of the leader selected is what will count most–setting the strategy, creating the culture and achieving exceptional results–not whether they came from inside or outside the company.

Read what Dean Freeman and fellow experts are saying about the latest topics for the Wall Street Journal.