Category: Case Competition

MBA Team Heads to Final Round of Aspen Institute Case Competition

April 4th, 2014 in Case Competition, Graduate Students, News, Students

Four MBA students from Boston University School of Management will compete in the third and final round of the Aspen Institute’s 2014 Business & Society International MBA Case Competition. One of only five finalist teams to advance, Ji Chong (MBA’14), David Cushman (MBA’14), Chris Kluesener (MBA’14), and Jonathan Sobin (MBA’14) head to New York today, Friday, April 4, to present their ideas to a panel of esteemed judges, including senior corporate executives, in the fifth annual global competition.

“Being among the top five teams selected is a great honor for us and speaks to the strength of BU’s MBA program, which has given us the tools needed to compete at this level,” says Cushman. “Competitions are a worthwhile experience as part of an MBA as they allow you to apply what you’ve learned and explore current business challenges faced by real companies.”

The subject of the case, which centers on marketing strategy and social impact, involves a Mexican grain-processing company that hopes to scale its operation in order to raise the standard of living in its rural town, and improve health issues in its native country.

While the judges deliberate on the team’s written submission and PowerPoint presentation, the students will meet corporate, philanthropic, academic, and other friends of the Aspen Institute over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. The competition’s prize pool is $35,000, unmatched in the MBA case competition circuit, with the first place team receiving $15,000 as well as $1,000 to donate to a charity of its choice.

“If we won the competition we would likely choose a charity that has a sustainability-focused mission and a history of successfully realizing that mission, such as the Environmental Defense Fund,” says Cushman.

Founded in 2009, the competition was born from a desire to design a best-in-class incentive program that encourages future business leaders to unite corporate profitability with social, environmental, and ethical awareness—three issues at the heart of business growth in the 21st century. The competition focuses on the positive impact a well-managed business can have in society, allowing students from 25 business programs worldwide to reflect on this significant influence.

The School of Management is one of those select programs, demonstrating its fervent mission to become of one of the world’s elite business schools. Celebrating 100 years of educating bold leaders in all management disciplines, SMG continues to foster innovation across the MBA program, launching an enhanced curriculum in fall 2013. The new curriculum offers deeper disciplinary learning opportunities in the transformative forces shaping our rapidly changing global economy.

The Aspen Institute, an international nonprofit founded in 1950 and based in Washington, D.C., is dedicated to fostering values-based leadership and providing a neutral and balanced venue for discussing and acting on critical issues.

Learn more about the the Aspen Institute’s 2014 Business & Society International MBA Case Competition here.

Ideas on big data and bridging gaps in care take top spots in 2014 BU Grand Business Challenge in Digital Health

March 26th, 2014 in Case Competition, Graduate Students, News, Students

Asking the big questions is only the start. Joining forces with lead sponsor Merck, Boston University School of Management hosted the second annual Boston University Grand Business Challenge in Digital Health, where teams of MBA students from outstanding business schools around the world started answering one of those big questions: How will information technology influence and transform global healthcare to create value for the world?

The second annual Grand Business Challenge in Digital Health awarded first place to Fudan University School of Management’s mission of bridging the gap between rural and urban populations by providing them equal healthcare opportunities by providing online consulting and education for rural doctors.

“Events such as this provide a real life context for MBA students to work on live problems rather than re-analyze past decisions through cases that they have done in their academic curriculum,” said N. Venkat Venkatraman, David J. McGrath Jr. Professor of Management at SMG and Grand Business Challenge case author and organizer.

“Moreover, unlike standard case competition, this allows students to learn from other students as well as executives from Merck. Given the importance of health sector in the globe and the pervasive availability of digital technology even in remote parts of India and China, digital health is a profoundly important topic. This event allowed us to orchestrate systematic thinking during intense 48 hour period that provided value to the students as well as to Merck.”

Presenting to a panel of Merck executives on specific technological developments, market moves and responses to trends took student’s ideas from a theoretical into a practical arena. Pitching to a specific organization required teams to tailor their advice based to Merck’s business model and offer insights that Merck could realistically implement.

In it’s second year the Grand Business Challenge in Digital Health invited 16 schools to participate. “We are thrilled to welcome such a diverse student population from all over the world,” said David Veira, Assistant Director of Graduate Programs at SMG.

Big ideas with big data

More efficient gathering, analyzing and use of patient data was a common thread in finalist presentations.

Working to reduce the number of medical errors, Medicare costs for unplanned re-hospitalizations and the amount of time and costs for documentation of inpatient nursing care, the MIT Sloan School of Management team took second place with their MerckMe web and app portal providing automated documentation, clinical decision support, and remote monitoring.

Columbia Business School’s idea to provide a digital platform of choice for patients and physicians to store, record and analyze patient data to increase disease diagnosis and patient adherence was awarded 3rd place.

With an initial focus on cardiovascular disease in the U.S., the fourth place team from University of Calgary Haskayne School of Business recommended enabling partnerships to promote the gathering of patient data while encouraging patient engagement and increasing preventative care through wearable devices, mobile apps, and streamed data.

Teams competing in the March 20-22 event included:

  • Boston University School of Management
  • Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business
  • Columbia Business School
  • Fudan University School of Management – Shanghai
  • IAE Business School – Argentina (Universidad Austral)
  • Indian Institute of Management (IIM) Calcutta
  • IPADE Business School – México (Universidad Panamericana)
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management (MIT Sloan)
  • The Ohio State University, Fisher College of Business
  • University of Arizona, Eller College of Management
  • University of Calgary, Haskayne School of Business
  • University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Anderson School of Management
  • University of New York in Prague (UNYP)
  • University of North Carolina, Kenan-Flagler Business School
  • University of Southern California, Marshall School of Business
  • Washington University in Saint Louis, Olin Business School

The 12 teams not selected to move on to the final presentations had the opportunity to present their ideas to venture capitalists.

Please visit bu.edu/casecomp for more information on the Grand Business Challenge in Digital Health.

MBA Case Competition Featured in Fortune

November 4th, 2013 in Case Competition, MBA, News, School, Students

Student work analyzed, celebrated

Senior editor of Fortune Ryan Bradley sat in on a recent case competition held by Boston University School of Management, which hosted teams of MBA students from around the world. The teams pitched ideas for a company that they believed would revolutionize health care—and earn them $22,500, plus the support of the event’s two hosts, Merck and Microsoft, to launch their startup. “Interested in seeing what bright MBAs-to-be were dreaming up as viable business solutions to different health care crises,” Bradley attended the competition, ultimately finding a theme within it: gamifying the system.

One of the many difficulties in treating chronic diseases is that one must adhere to a strict medical regimen and see it through to the end of its prescription. Chronic disease demands chronic medication. Taking medication is no fun, but the idea that it might be made a game is, at least, as old as Mary Poppins. The cost of not adhering to the full prescription of drugs is hundreds of billions of dollars in ongoing medical expenses, to say nothing of all the money lost by a drug manufacturer like Merck. At the BU case competition, the solution to patient recidivism wasn’t a spoonful of sugar but an app on your smartphone, an app that was, without fail, some kind of a game.

Bradley notes that the judges were not impressed by gamifying health care, as there is no guarantee that taking a pill can be fun, or that users can be trusted to enter accurate information, such as meals eaten or medication taken, into their smartphones. However, a clear winner finally emerged, touted by the Fortune editor as “startlingly different” and a “tangible solution to a real problem.”

A winner had to be announced by the end of day two, though I was growing weary and skeptical. How refreshing, then, when a team presented an idea startlingly different from all the others. It wasn’t a piece of software at all, but a backpack, filled with durable hardware (solar powered battery charger, lensless microscope, blood diagnostic tests, pulse oximeter) for collecting vital, and valuable, health data. The team was focused on collecting data from the developing world, where much of the population goes unrecorded, but the concept would work in the U.S., too, or anywhere else with people who have limited access to health services.

Read the full piece here.

BU Team Soars at MIT Clean Energy Competition

May 10th, 2013 in Case Competition, Energy & Environment Sector, Entrepreneurship, Graduate Students, News, School, Students

Team Wins First Prize in Energy Efficiency Category

By Mark Dwortzan via BU College of Engineering

A College of Engineering and School of Management team took first prize in the energy efficiency category of the annual MIT Clean Energy Prize on May 6, one of six premiere regional clean energy student business plan competitions in the U.S.

A collaboration between students and faculty from ENG and SMG, the team, Aeolus Building Efficiency, won $20,000 for its business plan and presentation for a full-service company that utilizes software to optimize airflow and reduce energy consumption in large office heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems. The technology could be a game-changer for today’s commercial buildings, which account for 18 percent of annual greenhouse gas emissions and 36 percent of national electric utility demand.

Consisting of ENG’s senior Ryan Cruz, Associate Professor Michael Gevelber, and former Professor Donald Wroblewski from the Mechanical Engineering Department, and MBA candidates David Cushman, Jonathan Ellermann, and Benjamin Smith from SMG, Aeolus outperformed 15 other teams from nine states, including three semifinalists representing Harvard University, MIT, and the University of Chicago.

Aeolus drew on ENG members’ expertise in building energy efficiency and HVAC systems optimization, and SMG members’ business development, operations, project management and sustainability experience. The team’s presentation impressed a panel of six judges from academia, government and industry who based their assessments on environmental benefit, creativity, execution and financial strategy, market and customer knowledge, and team strength.

Benjamin Smith (MBA’13) relished the opportunity to compete against outstanding teams and technologies from some of the nation’s top academic institutions. “Not only were we able to develop a comprehensive and compelling business plan, but the competition gave us an opportunity to substantiate that plan with cleantech industry leaders,” he observed. “It was an amazing experience.”

Taking part in the competition reinforced Ryan Cruz’s (ME’13) aspiration to pursue a career in the energy efficiency field. “I was able to learn more about the business side of engineering and aspects of building energy efficiency that I would not have normally been exposed to in the classroom,” he said.

“It was a great learning experience for all the team members, and we’re proud to get BU’s name recognized at such a highly competitive event,” said Gevelber (ME, MSE, SE).  ”We also had great mentoring from other BU faculty in both schools, and received support from BU’s Office of Technology Development, Institute for Technology, Entrepreneurship and Commercialization (ITEC) and Sustainable Neighborhood Lab.”

HVAC systems account for a large portion of energy use in mid- to large-sized buildings, and energy use and cost scales strongly with airflow. This is particularly true in older buildings designed when energy was much cheaper and HVAC systems were designed with high air flow rates. Based on concepts developed by Paul Gallagher (ME, MS’13) in his master’s thesis, Aeolus aims to commercialize its software-based service that enables room-by-room measurement and optimization of airflow rates, thereby reducing energy consumption while maintaining thermal comfort and meeting ventilation requirements.

Invented by Gevelber, Wroblewski, and Gallagher and now being patented by BU, the breakthrough technology uses existing, computer-based building automation systems to reduce large building HVAC energy consumption by up to 20 percent without equipment installation, intensive manual labor or long payback periods.

“What’s amazing about our approach is that the system would take the same time to work on a building the size of Sargent College as it would for the Prudential Center,” Gevelber explained.

Formed in 2007 to help develop a new generation of energy entrepreneurs and companies and sponsored by NSTAR and the U.S. Department of Energy, the MIT Clean Energy Prize offers awards in three categories—renewable energy, infrastructure and resources, and energy efficiency.  The competition’s $20,000 Energy Efficiency Track Prize is sponsored by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, which seeks to accelerate the success of clean energy technologies, companies and projects in the Commonwealth while creating high-quality jobs and long-term economic growth for the people of Massachusetts.

Pictured above is Team Aeolus Building Efficiency: Professor Michael Gevelber (ME, MSE, SE), David Cushman (MBA’14), Jonathan Ellermann (MBA’13), Ryan Cruz (ME’13), and Benjamin Smith (MBA’13) with $20,000 Energy Efficiency Track Prize. (A sixth Aeolus team member, former Professor Donald Wroblewski (ME) was unavailable for the photo.)

MBA Team Wins First Place in P&G Sustainability Challenge

April 30th, 2013 in Case Competition, Energy & Environment Sector, Graduate Students, News, School

BU competition featured eight multidisciplinary teams of undergraduates and graduates; first place team will go on to present ideas to Gillette’s top managers

By Gilberto Millares (IMBA’13) from the BU MBA Student Life blog

Some of Procter & Gamble’s sustainability goals for the future include completely eliminating the waste they currently generate, using only renewable energy in all their facilities, and having environmentally-friendly products and packages. As you might guess, such endeavors present an extremely difficult challenge for a global company, so they are constantly looking for ways to make marginal or disruptive changes in their operations that allow them to be closer to achieving these goals. One of the ways they’re doing this is by sponsoring the P&G Gillette Sustainability Challenge, which brings together multidisciplinary teams from different Boston University schools and colleges and challenges them to come up with ideas that might be applied in P&G operations.

On April 12, eight teams consisting of undergraduate and graduate students from programs including engineering, public policy, biomedical engineering, and management had the opportunity to showcase their findings to a group of managers from P&G Gillette, Veolia, and NSTAR. We presented different ideas that would allow P&G to increase their renewable energy consumption at the South Boston Gillette site by making a business case for each proposed project.

While the format differed a bit from the standard case competition, the results were just as meaningful. Rather than diving into the project for 48 hours, we were given two weeks to find different approaches to help them achieve their goals. And even though it might sound like more than sufficient lead time, we had to fit several seminars into our busy schedules to learn about energy projects throughout the country and the world, research technologies that are being implemented in the industry, and find ways to link business and engineering aspects for each submitted idea—no easy task!

Finally, after all the teams had presented their ideas, we had a small reception as the judges made the final decision. First place was awarded to a team consisting of MBA and IMBA students (pictured above), as well as LEAP, mechanical engineering, and public policy students, who will now have the opportunity to present their pitch to a group of Gillette’s top managers. However, I think the most rewarding aspect of the competition was working with a truly diverse group of people that mimics the diversity and complexities of the business world.

Pictured: The winning team of MBA and IMBA students with the panel of judges from P&G Gillette, Veolia, and NSTAR. Group photo courtesy of the BU MBA Student Life blog.

Homepage image via flickr user Pylon757.

Winners of the 2013 Grand Business Challenge in Digital Health Announced

April 5th, 2013 in Case Competition, Graduate Students, Health Sector, News, School

Fifteen teams competed in first-of-its-kind event hosted by SMG

A team of MBA students from The Fuqua School of Business at Duke University won first place in the Grand Business Challenge in Digital Health, sponsored by Merck and hosted by Boston University School of Management on March 21-23, 2013. The event was also sponsored by Microsoft and the MS·MBA Association.

All 15 teams came together for a dinner reception and networking at Microsoft in Cambridge, Mass.

All 15 teams came together for a dinner reception and networking at Microsoft in Cambridge, Mass.

Formerly the International Technology Strategy Case Competition, the two-day event challenged teams of MBA students from the world’s leading business schools to offer their ideas on how Merck could leverage information technology to transform global healthcare and create value for the world. Unlike a traditional case competition, the Grand Business Challenge allowed for networking and cross-team collaboration, utilized a live case, and allowed each team to focus on one of four tracks of digital health: individual, interconnected, information, and international.

On the first day of the event, each team presented their ideas on challenges in one of the four tracks of digital health. A panel of industry judges selected a winning team from each track to compete in the final round of the Grand Business Challenge the following day.

The Fuqua School of Business (pictured above) was awarded first place for their MercKIT solution, a mobile, cloud-based health clinic kit equipped for front line diagnosis and the treatment of infectious diseases. The team also won the Audience Choice Prize.

The second place team from the University of Southern California, Marshall School of Business, developed a patient-centered mobile phone platform, customizable by country and culture, to engage patients in their health and bolster growth in emerging economies.

Boston University School of Management placed third for their concept, the Adhero platform. Using existing digestible sensor technology embedded on pills, the platform would collect data on medication adherence, provide rewards or reminders to patients, and send data back to providers. Fourth place team University of Calgary Haskayne School of Business proposed an online portal that would facilitate information and a sense of community between customers, payers, producers, and providers.

Teams also had the opportunity to win grants from Microsoft BizSpark to further develop their ideas on digital health. The Microsoft BizSpark Challenge winners were teams from IPADE Business School – Mexico, Neeley School of Business, Anderson School of Management, Tepper School of Business, and a team with members from Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business and Kenan-Flagler Business School.

The fifteen participating teams were:

  • Boston University School of Management
  • Carnegie Mellon University Tepper School of Business
  • Cornell University Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management
  • Duke University – The Fuqua School of Business
  • El Instituto Panamericano de Alta Dirección de Empresa (IPADE Business School – Mexico)
  • Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Business School
  • Indian School of Business
  • Seoul National University Business School
  • Texas Christian University Neeley School of Business
  • University of Arizona Eller College of Management
  • University of Calgary Haskayne School of Business
  • University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Anderson School of Management
  • University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School
  • University of Pittsburgh Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business
  • University of Southern California Marshall School of Business

Read a blog post from the Grand Business Challenge’s Volunteer Coordinator Laura Wasowski (MS·MBA’13) about the event.

    Winners of 1st Annual Global Health Sector Interdisciplinary Case Competition Announced

    November 16th, 2012 in Case Competition, Health Sector, News

    A team of MBA students from Harvard Business School won first place in the 1st Annual Global Health Sector Interdisciplinary Case Competition, sponsored by DePuy Synthes Spine, a Johnson & Johnson Company, and hosted by Boston University.

    Sam Schweizer (MBA'13), Committee Chair; Mark Allan, Director of Health Sector Management Program, Boston University School of Management; Max Reinhardt, V.P. Worldwide Marketing at DePuy Synthes Spine companies of Johnson & Johnson; Shirley Leong, Jason Bae, Judith Li, Jesse Li of Harvard Business School; Andrea Sodano, Executive-in-Residence and Tim Beardsley, Worldwide Director of R&D, DePuy Synthes Spine.

    Sam Schweizer (MBA'13), Committee Chair; Mark Allan, Director of Health Sector Management Program, Boston University School of Management; Max Reinhardt, V.P. Worldwide Marketing at DePuy Synthes Spine companies of Johnson & Johnson; Shirley Leong, Jason Bae, Judith Li, Jesse Li of Harvard Business School; Andrea Sodano, Executive-in-Residence, Boston University School of Management; and Tim Beardsley, Worldwide Director of R&D, DePuy Synthes Spine.

    The invitation-only competition, worth $32,500 in prizes, challenged teams of students from the world’s leading MBA programs to solve a health sector market challenge. Each team had 24 hours to develop a proposal recommending a course of action on a strategic business initiative focused on current issues related to medical devices in the global health sector. The teams then presented their findings before a panel of judges from leading health sector companies, including sponsor DePuy Synthes Spine.

    The competition is unique due to its interdisciplinary nature; in addition to MBA students, each team included a public health, medicine, engineering, or law student. The event took place at Boston University School of Management on November 1-3, 2012.

    The winning team from Harvard Business School was awarded the top prize of $20,000. Team members included Jason Bae, Shirley Leong, Jesse Li, and Judith Li. Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University, came in second place, and Fuqua School of Business, Duke University came in third place. The finalists were announced during an awards reception on Saturday, November 3.

    The schools who competed in this year’s event included:

    • Boston University School of Management
    • CEIBS (China Europe International Business School)
    • Frankfurt School of Finance and Management
    • Fuqua School of Business, Duke University
    • Harvard Business School, Harvard University
    • Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
    • Indian Institute of Management (IIM), Ahmedabad
    • IPADE Business School, Universidad Panamericana, Mexico
    • Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
    • Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto
    • Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College and The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science

    BU to Host 1st Annual Global Health Sector Interdisciplinary Case Competition

    October 26th, 2012 in Case Competition, Graduate Students, News, School, Students

    Twelve elite teams to compete in DePuy Synthes Spine-sponsored challenge

    GlobalHealthCaseLogo-FINAL22
     
    The 1st Annual Global Health Sector Interdisciplinary Case Competition is an invitation-only 24-hour case competition that challenges top MBA students to solve a health sector market challenge related to medical devices in the global health sector.

    Eleven student teams from the world’s leading MBA programs will join host BU to compete before industry judges, including senior leadership from event sponsor DePuy Synthes. The competition is unique due to its interdisciplinary nature; in addition to MBA students, every team must also include a public health, medicine, engineering, or law student.

    The competition recognizes the best up-and-coming MBA strategists who understand real-world business issues within the health sector and can create valuable recommendations for DePuy Synthes Spine. Additionally, student teams are able to showcase their talents to top executives in the health sector field.

    “Case competitions are great practice for working in a high functioning team to deliver a quality solution under a very tight timetable,” said Sam Schweizer, MBA’13 in Health Sector Management, who is helping to project manage the case competition and related events. “This competition is also a fantastic opportunity to network with students from other graduate schools and judges from the business world.”

    Participating schools include:

    • Boston University School of Management
    • CEIBS (China Europe International Business School)
    • Frankfurt School of Finance and Management
    • Fuqua School of Business, Duke University
    • Harvard Business School, Harvard University
    • Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
    • Indian Institute of Management (IIM), Ahmedabad
    • IPADE Business School, Universidad Panamericana, Mexico
    • Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
    • Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto
    • Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College and The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science

    The top three teams will receive cash prizes of $20,000, $7,500, and $5,000, respectively.

    Boston University School of Management hosted an internal competition October 6-7, 2012 to select BU’s case competition team. “The field was very strong,” said Mark Allan, faculty director of the School’s Health Sector Management Program.

    The winning team chosen to represent Boston University consisted of three MBA students, Anshu Mironi, Matt Scott, and David Spotts, and one dual MD/MBA student, Sunil Nair. “The internal selection round gave the winning team a chance to work together in the competitive setting,” said Schweizer.

    The 1st Annual Global Health Sector Interdisciplinary Case Competition is scheduled for November 1-3, 2012, with final presentations, an award ceremony, and a reception scheduled for Saturday, November 3. For more information and to RSVP for final presentations, please visit the case competition website. Events are open to the entire BU community.

    To read more about MBA student Sam Schweizer’s experience planning the event, visit the MBA Student Blog.

    BU Team Second in Emory Case Competition

    April 6th, 2012 in Case Competition, Graduate Students, News, School, Students

    Multidisciplinary Team Shines in Complex Healthcare Case

    BU team members, from left, Ivan Busulwa (MBA/MPH’12), Darash Desai (ENG’14), Meg Meyer (MBA/MPH’12), Catherine Shih (MBA/MPH’13, Daniel Silva (MED’13), and Sunil Nair (MD/MBA’13).

    BU team members, from left, Ivan Busulwa (MBA/MPH’12), Darash Desai (ENG’14), Meg Meyer (MBA/MPH’12), Catherine Shih (MBA/MPH’13), Daniel Silva (MED’15), and Sunil Nair (MD/MBA’13)

    The examples and rewards of Boston University President Robert Brown’s concept of “One BU” continue to roll in.

    This time, it was an interdisciplinary team of students carrying off second place in a 23-university case competition.

    A Boston University team of six with three MBA/MPH students, an MD/MBA student, a medical student, and a doctoral student in biomedical engineering came in second out of 23 teams in the Global Health Case Competition at Emory University on March 31. The home team, Emory, won. This is the first time BU competed in this event.

    Boston University also won the “Audience Choice Award” voted by their peers in the contest.

    The team members were Ivan Busulwa (MBA/MPH’12), Darash Desai (ENG’14), Meg Meyer (MBA/MPH’12), Sunil Nair (MD/MBA’13), Catherine Shih (MBA/MPH’13), and Daniel Silva (MED’15).

    The multidisciplinary competition, developed and coordinated by the Emory Global Health Institute’s Student Advisory Committee, includes graduate and undergraduate students from numerous fields including agricultural and life sciences, business, engineering, law, medicine, nursing, public health, theology, the social sciences and the humanities.

    The Global Health Contest is designed to raise awareness of and develop innovative solutions for 21st century global health issues. Teams receive a global health-related case that requires an interdisciplinary approach to formulate recommendations that may involve issues such as health care policy, public health implementation and planning, business partnership/investment, medical research, logistics management, faith/cultural understanding, and international law.

    The 2012 case had political overtones as well as health and development issues. The question was: “Develop a strategy for Canadian aid to Sri Lanka that deals with the health and resettlement issues of the Tamil population, keeping in mind the resistance of the Sinhalese government to accusations of war crimes and persecution, and recognizing the presence of a great many Tamil refugees in Canada.”

    The US teams were Boston University, Claremont Graduate University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Duke University, Northwestern University, Princeton University, Tulane University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of California at San Francisco, University of Chicago, University of Miami, University of Pennsylvania, University of Southern California, University of Virginia, Vanderbilt University, Yale University, and Yeshiva University.

    The international teams were Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México, McGill University (Canada), Universidad de los Andes (Colombia), and the University of Oxford (UK). Additionally, the University of British Columbia and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel) competed in a pilot contest via video stream, which took place at the same time as the full case competition.

    Technology and business join forces for education at BU case competition sponsored by Ericsson

    April 2nd, 2012 in Case Competition, Digital Technology Sector, News, Press Release, School

    • 64 students from 16 schools in 24-hour, Boston University School of Management’s 2012 International Tech Strategy Business Case Competition
    • Students tackle how to improve access to education in a Networked Society
    • Top prize won for leading strategy aimed at creating value in a Networked Society through education and expertise

    Boston University School of Management and Ericsson have announced that a team of MBA students from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill has won first place in the seventh annual International Tech Strategy Business Case Competition. The invitation-only, 24-hour competition, worth $47,500 in prizes, challenges business students to help solve real issues that face global technology leaders. The event took place at Boston University School of Management on March 29-31, 2012. This is the fifth consecutive year that Ericsson has sponsored the competition.

    This year’s competition focused on the role a Networked Society could play in innovating education. Each team was asked how Ericsson could develop successful business models that will create value for the world in a Networked Society through education and the sharing and combining of expertise.

    The team from the Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill was awarded the top prize of ,000.

    The team from the Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill was awarded the top prize of $25,000. Pictured, from left to right: Todd Valentine, Case Competition Committee Chair; Maciej Dudek, Rohan Vaidyanathan, Christophe Renaud, and Jae Lee, the winning students from Kenan-Flagler; Boston University School of Management Dean Kenneth Freeman; and Helena Norrman, Senior Vice President and Head of Communications, Ericsson.

    The team from the Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill was awarded the top prize of $25,000. Team members included Jae Lee, Rohan Vaidyanathan, Christophe Renaud, and Maciej Dudek. The winning team took a holistic, two-pronged approach to closing the gaps in communication and access to information with their “Education Technology Platform” (ETP).

    The remaining top four schools include Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in second place, Duke University in third place, and University of Southern California in fourth place.

    “Ericsson believes that the Networked Society is not just about connecting devices, it’s about the power that is unleashed when everything is connected,” said Helena Norrman, Senior Vice President and Head of Communications, Ericsson, who was on hand to deliver the award. “At the core of this transformation is education, which can now be offered to people everywhere, regardless of social or geographical boundaries. The development of human potential within society as well as inside enterprises will change the world for the better. It was fantastic to take part in the thoughts, insights and ideas on the topic that the students brought into the final round,” she added.

    John Chalykoff, Associate Dean at Boston University School of Management, said: “The competition brings together the world’s most respected IT-oriented MBA programs and creates an enthusiastic experience while advancing innovative ideas about real-world business issues, and nothing is more ripe for transformation than education.”

    According to this year’s case author and Boston University School of Management Professor N Venkatraman, one of the most important challenges of the case was the need to devise a business strategy that would remove the physical limitations that often accompany education, and develop ideas to digitally spread educational opportunities to all members of society. “I believe that this year’s competition raised issues that are relevant and timely, not only for Ericsson as it delivers products and services for the networked society, but also for Boston University School of Management as we embrace and examine how technology influences the way we deliver management education.”

    Schools competing in this year’s event included:

    • Boston University School of Management
    • Eller College of Management – University of Arizona
    • Fuqua School of Business – Duke University
    • Haas School of Business – UC Berkeley
    • Harvard Business School – Harvard University
    • Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
    • IESE Business School – University of Navarra, Spain
    • IPADE Business School – Universidad Panamericana, Mexico
    • Kenan-Flagler Business School – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    • Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California
    • McCombs School of Business – University of Texas, Austin
    • Queen’s School of Business, Canada
    • Richard Ivey School of Business – University of Western Ontario, Canada
    • Saïd Business School – University of Oxford, UK
    • Seoul National University, Korea
    • Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth

     

    Media Contact:
    Adriane Dean
    Marketing & Communications Manager
    Boston University School of Management
    Direct: 617-358-0234
    adean@bu.edu