Category: Energy & Environment Sector

The Giving Tree

March 7th, 2012 in Energy & Environment Sector, News, School, Student Activities, Students

Photo by Cydney Scott for Boston University Photography

Signs of spring in SMG’s lobby? No, the initialed Starbucks cups are part of a student sustainability project distributing 500 reusable mugs to the SMG community. Posters will show the number of cups saved by using the mugs and the impact on water and energy and advocate for more sustainability. Teaming up on the effort are the Net Impact Club, Sustainabilty@BU, SMG Student Government, and business fraternity Delta Sigma Pi.

Photo by Cydney Scott for Boston University Photography via BU Today

CoffeeCupTeam 2012

Undergraduate members of Net Impact helped distribute stainless steel cups in the School’s Starbucks this week. From left, Erich Staib (BSBA ’12), project coordinator Joe Nangle (BSBA ’12), Becca Farmer (BSBA ’12), and Lara Hages, exchange student from Technische Universitat Dresden, Germany.

How To Become a Greentrepreneur

December 9th, 2011 in Energy & Environment Sector, Entrepreneurship, News, Sectors

Next session begins Feb. 15 - Apply now

“People want to break into the green sector, but they don’t know how,” says Paul McManus, managing director of the Institute for Technology Entrepreneurship & Commercialization (ITEC) at Boston University.

“We’re in touch with all kinds of entrepreneurs and people with great business skills who want to dive in and be part of the alternative energy, environmental, and sustainable business areas,” Mcmanus continues, “but they’re all looking for ways to get up to speed before getting involved.”

lightbulbIt’s one of the specialties of Boston University faculty and the School of Management has a program that fits the need perfectly.

Last year, The Executive Leadership Center at Boston University School of Management partnered with the New England Clean Energy Council (NECEC) to form the Leading Clean Energy Ventures Certificate Program. Now accepting applications for its second year, the program’s goal is to encourage and prepare experienced entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs to enter the clean technology sector, leading to new venture formation, job creation, and growth of the clean energy industry.

According to McManus, “The program addresses a simple but acute problem: a lack of experienced entrepreneurs and seasoned executives in the clean energy sector. Our goal for this program is to help individuals accelerate their transition into the clean energy sector.”

Participants examine the finite details of clean energy with industry experts and develop practical capstone projects that result in a new business concept, market strategy, business plan, or financing model.


First Year Testimonials.

Veda Ferlazzo Clark was CEO of a commercial lighting manufacturer before deciding to enroll in the 2011 Leading Clean Energy Ventures Certificate program. In her role as CEO, Veda had driven the company’s mission to become a sustainable manufacturer of energy efficient products.

“In lighting, we were ‘beside’ clean tech, but not in clean tech,” said Veda. “I wanted to learn more about the structure of and influences on the many industries that compose clean tech.”

“The program touched on, and in some cases took a pretty deep dive into, all of the key pieces—technologies, financing, regulatory issues. It helped to bring into focus many relevant topics and an understanding of how the pieces of the puzzle sometimes fit together – and sometimes don’t.”

Since completing the program, Veda has been assisting several start-ups she met while in the program. She is also helping Mass Manufacturing Extension Partnership develop an energy and sustainability roadmap for small to mid-sized manufacturers.

Her ultimate goal? “Help a clean-tech company grow in the role of CEO.”

Ramesh Kumar, head of corporate development at Mavizen, attended the program in 2011 and focused on developing an electric powertrain technology for an electric bike. The serial entrepreneur had recently sold his mobile couponing and ticketing firm, Activemedia Technologies, to a British company. “Over the course of the program,” Kumar says, “the project evolved; it expanded into applying the powertrain technology for cars, bikes, or even jet skis. I was able to use the capstone project of LCEV program to refine our pitch to OEMs. In fact, I left the BU lecture theater after our final capstone presentation to pitch to one of the largest motorbike manufacturers in the world at our facility in the UK.

“After the program, our company has further evolved it into a battery management system that we sell to auto OEMs and battery manufacturers and our value-add to them is the software that manages the energy efficiently, monitors the cells, and extends the life of a battery pack for different applications.”

Kumar came to the program to help refine an idea. He not only did that, but added, “This group really helped accelerate the iterations in the business, gave me access to new relationships, finding resources, being exposed to funding sources and ideas. I made some new contacts that will be valuable through the entrepreneurial journey. We have recently developed some new IP that has allowed us to pitch on a proposal for grid storage at the residential level for 30,000 homes. We are talking to city governments and utilities to help them manage the day and night load through innovative storage solutions at residential level. That’s a whole other direction for us as we continue to find the right niche.”

Applications Due January 16.

To insure a good mix of participants, all applicants will be interviewed. The module-based classes begin February 15 and end May 16.

To learn more about program specifics or to apply, visit http://smg.bu.edu/exec/elc/LeadingCleanEnergyVentures/index.shtml

Why Is the U.S. Losing the Green Race?

October 21st, 2011 in Digital Technology Sector, Energy & Environment Sector, Faculty, News, Sectors, Social Impact

greenbu

Nalin Kulatilaka, finance professor and co-director of the Clean Energy Initiative at Boston University, joins the discussion in the New York Times Room for Debate series.

According to Professor Nalin Kulatilaka, a smart grid is crucial.

“Americans pride themselves on being global leaders in innovation. So why is the nation lagging behind China and Germany on renewable energy?

The failure of clean energy efforts in the U.S. comes not from a lack of technology innovations, but from the lack of their widespread adoption. Rather than singling out specific companies or industries, our clean energy efforts should focus on building a smarter electricity system, one in which consumers and producers base their decisions on timely information that reflect true costs. Such a system will accelerate the adoption of clean energy by bridging information gaps that are dissuading investments and inhibiting energy-saving behavior.

“Once businesses and individuals can see what drives up their electric bills, a wide range of new energy business models will emerge.”

Once businesses and individuals can see what drives up their electric bills, a wide range of new energy business models will emerge.

The sources of generating electricity, hence the environmental impact and costs, change often and unpredictably. In the current system this is opaque to retail users. By making prices readily visible, smart electricity systems will reduce energy use. In fact, some European countries already have appliances that receive pricing information from the grid and are programmed to run during cheaper times. Having a smart grid is also essential in integrating renewable sources of energy like solar and wind by better managing their intermittent availability. Such a system is also imperative for the electrification of the transportation sector that needs to coordinate charging batteries with availability of cheap and clean sources of power. Because electricity and the transportation sector currently consume two-thirds of our fossil fuel use, these changes would have an enormous impact.

With the smart electricity infrastructure in place, a wide range of new energy business models will emerge. For example, the new information will enable cheaper and better audits of buildings’ energy use, which would help to tailor efficiency improvements.

As with the highway system, by investing public resources on a smart electricity infrastructure, we can create a truly transformative environment in complementary sectors and can take the U.S. to a leadership position in clean energy.”

Once businesses and individuals can see what drives up their electric bills, a wide range of new energy business models will emerge.

BU Offers Jumpstart for Green Biz Opportunities.

July 27th, 2011 in Energy & Environment Sector, News, Sectors, SMG Hot Topics

GreenGlobe

New opportunities. New regulations. New customer expectations.

Some companies, such as Praxair, Johnson & Johnson, and State Street Global Advisors, are leading the way in preparing for the rapidly expanding global green economy. They already enjoy first-mover advantage. But for those who ready to make the move, a new School of Management executive program can bring professionals up to speed fairly quickly.

Green Economies in Globalized Markets is an intense three-day program (September 21-23) led by Paul McManus, executive director of the Boston University Sustainable Cities project, and Norine Kennedy, vice president of energy and environment affairs for United States Council for International Business. They’re joined by several Boston University management professors researching the commercial and financial opportunities and challenges that will shape the next several decades of worldwide commerce and energy policies.

Time to get moving.

According to Professor Adil Najam, Nobel Prize winner, international climate change expert, and member of the program faculty, “Most companies have not yet realized—or at least acted upon—all the changes that are coming in global governance, institutional frameworks, regulatory policy, and the large-scale mobilization of our financial, technological, and industrial resources. Adds McManus, “Climate change is binding us closer together across the globe, as well as raising challenges we have never faced before. But it also presents opportunities for those who are early to market.”

The Green Economies program will address how groups like the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) are promoting policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people around the world, how companies can plan and strategize, and what is unknown and unknown about the shorter and longer-range future. Using case studies, panel discussions, and recent and ongoing research, faculty experts will cover what innovations are around the corner, what international policies will influence trade and governmental decisions, what alliances hold the power, what new business models are forming, and more.

The program ends with a panel on best practices and action plans that attendees take back to their organizations.

BU’s Clean Energy and Environmental Sustainability Initiative Announces Fall 2010 Presidential Lecture Series

August 12th, 2010 in Energy & Environment Sector, School, Sectors

Boston University’s Clean Energy and Environmental Sustainability Initiative (CEESI) has announced the fall 2010 lineup for its Presidential Lecture series. CEESI, co-directed by faculty from Boston University School of Management, College of Engineering, and College of Arts and Sciences, aims to “provide a forum to learn from leaders about best practices, leading-edge research, and policy and market trends in the fields of clean technology and energy sustainability.”

CEESI’s lecture series is designed to foster “discussion around technology, development, and research requirements that drive market growth and innovation in this crucial sector.”

Fall 2010 inaugural speakers
Majumdar-small Arun Majumdar
Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E), US Department of Energy
“ARPA-E: Addressing the Sputniks of Our Generation“
Wednesday, September 29, 2010, 4:00– 5:15 pm
Lewis Nathan S. Lewis
George L. Argyros Professor of Chemistry, California Institute of Technology
“Where in the World Will Our Energy Come From?”
Thursday, October 28, 2010, 3:30– 4:45 pm

 

Register for or see more information about these lectures.

Related news story: Clean Energy Heats Up at Boston University: New Lectures and Research, Spring 2010

Clean Energy Heats Up at Boston University: New Lectures and Research

August 9th, 2010 in Energy & Environment Sector, Finance, Information Systems, School, Sectors, Social Impact, Strategy & Innovation

Lectures on Energy & Environmental Sustainability – Spring 2010 Lineup Announced

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BU School of Management (SMG) faculty and their colleagues across the University are energizing the debate over how best to accelerate the development and adoption of sustainable clean energy solutions, through new research, conferences, and lectures.

See the schedule for the 2010 Boston University Presidential Lectures on Clean Energy and Environmental Sustainability.

See video from the recent School of Management event Smart Grid as a Business Platform: Innovation, Adaptation, and Systems Challenges in the Clean Energy Market

 

MORE ABOUT THE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT NEW RESEARCH INIATIVES IN CLEAN ENERGY

Generating Thought Leadership in the Field

Explains Professor Kulatilaka, “my colleagues and I working at SMG and across the University on clean energy innovation are seeking to leverage and expand our research initiatives in the following key areas:

  1. Research in systems, business models, and smart grid technologies required for the large scale integration of renewables, electric vehicles, and smart buildings into the electric power infrastructure.
  2. Development and commercialization of new and emerging clean energy technologies through entrepreneurial business incubation, education, support and market integration.
  3. Analysis and development of policy initiatives, requisite real-time market developments, incentive arrangements, and regulatory frameworks related to energy, climate, and the environment.”

In summary, Professor Kulatilaka adds, “we expect that exploration into the transformation of the energy ecosystem as smart technology will enable fundamentally new layers in the industry stack to emerge. We’re excited to work with colleagues across academia, and partners in industry, anticipate, navigate, and tap these opportunities.”

The “Synergistic Management of Challenges to Sustainable Energy Adoption”

Assessing the state of clean energy technology development and adoption to date, Professor Kulatilaka explains, “Many environmentally-friendly technologies, when considered in isolation, encounter barriers to widespread adoption.

“For example, wind generated electricity may see its widespread adoption hampered by increasing costs of the fast capacity reserves required to safeguard against wind’s intermittency. Similarly, high penetration of electric vehicles may be checked by the cost of expanding the capacity of requisite distribution network.”

Of the new research he and his colleagues are undertaking, Professor Kulatilaka says, “Our multi-disciplinary team proposes synergistic management of these technologies. For example, coordinated smart charging of electric vehicle (EV) batteries can both mitigate the intermittency of wind power and ease congestion in the distribution network.

“Indeed, many clean energy technologies, including roof top photovoltaics, distributed storage, thermal energy conversion and conservation, offer sustainable solutions when combined with real-time markets enabled by the requisite cyber infrastructure for real-time information.”

“In addition,” he adds, “we propose new business models that use markets and innovative contract forms to connect generators, transmission and distribution (T&D) with end-users. Bridging information gaps, reducing transactions costs, and managing risk, such networked business models can direct investment capital to clean projects, spawn technological innovations and encourage greener end-user behavior.

“Moreover, such business models are key to motivating the evolutionary public policy that will facilitate this critical shift to energy sustainability.”

PAST CONFERENCES & EVENTS ACROSS BOSTON UNIVERSITY:

How Boston University is Building Tomorrow’s Clean Energy Leaders

August 4th, 2010 in Digital Technology Sector, Energy & Environment Sector, MediaWatch, Sectors, SMG Hot Topics, Video

How Boston University is Building Tomorrows Clean Energy Leaders.

Video from the event Smart Grid as a Business Platform: Innovation, Adaptation, and Systems Challenges in the Clean Energy Market, held at the Time-Life Center in New York and hosted by Boston University School of Management.

Video from the event “Smart Grid as a Business Platform: Innovation, Adaptation, and Systems Challenges in the Clean Energy Market,” hosted by Boston University School of Management at the Time & Life Conference Center, NYC, on October 7, 2009.

Moderator:
Louis E. Lataif
, Allen Questrom Professor and Dean, Boston University School of Management

Panelists:
Nalin Kulatilaka, The Wing Tat Lee Family Professor in Management, Boston University School of Management
Kenneth Lutchen, Dean, Boston University College of Engineering
Brian Dumaine, Global Editor, Fortune

Graduate School of Management Net Impact Chapter Gets Top Global Designation

July 7th, 2010 in Energy & Environment Sector, Graduate Students, School, Sectors, Social Impact, Students

One of Only Three Schools Across New England to Achieve Top Worldwide Status

Boston University’s Graduate School of Management (GSM) Net Impact chapter has achieved Gold status for 2010; it is one of only three graduate chapters across all of New England to receive this top designation, and one of only 16 in the world.

“Gold chapters are the most outstanding chapters in the Net Impact network. They are characterized by energetic members, dynamic leadership, and excellence in all that they do.”

-Net Impact Central

Net Impact is a global nonprofit, spread across six continents, that aims to “inspire, educate, and equip individuals to use the power of business to create a more socially and environmentally sustainable world.”

Gold chapters, the organization explains “are the most outstanding chapters in the Net Impact network. They are characterized by energetic members, dynamic leadership, and excellence in all that they do. They also…actively give back to the network by sharing best practices, mentoring other chapters, and working with Net Impact Central to improve chapter offerings.

The GSM Net Impact chapter is run by a group of the School’s MBA students and is supported by faculty and the Public & Nonprofit Management Program. This year, they have been joined at the School of Management by a new undergraduate Net Impact chapter.

See the full list of Gold and Silver chapter designees from Net Impact.

What Timberland Is Doing to Reduce the Company’s Impact on Deforestation

May 28th, 2010 in Energy & Environment Sector, MediaWatch, Sectors, SMG Hot Topics, Video

What Timberland Is Doing to Reduce the Company’s Impact on Deforestation.

In this video, Kristen McCormack kicks off the conversation with Timberland President & CEO Jeffrey Swartz about our collective responsibility with a question concerning the company’s use of leather and its impact on deforestation. He explains Timberland’s commitment towards a traceable supply chain in a movement around sustainability..

In this video, Kristen McCormack kicks off the conversation with Timberland President & CEO Jeffrey Swartz about our collective responsibility with a question concerning the company’s use of leather and its impact on deforestation.  He explains Timberland’s commitment towards a traceable supply chain in a movement around sustainability.

What is the role of business in the climate debate? Engage with Timberland on this topic at www.earthkeeper.com/voicesofchallenge.

 

Watch other videos about Timberland:

Have Consumers Made a Change?

May 28th, 2010 in Energy & Environment Sector, MediaWatch, Sectors, SMG Hot Topics, Video

Have Consumers Made a Change?

In this video, Kristen McCormack asks have consumers made a change? Jeffery Swartz, Timberland President & CEO, discusses consumers impact on sustainability, as well as the company’s responsibility to listen to their consumers.

In this video, Kristen McCormack asks “have consumers made a change?” Jeffery Swartz, Timberland President & CEO, discusses consumers’ impact on sustainability, as well as the company’s responsibility to listen to their consumers.

What is the role of business in the climate debate? Engage with Timberland on this topic at www.earthkeeper.com/voicesofchallenge.

 

Watch other videos about Timberland: