Category: Graduate Students

Congratulations 2012 Internal Case Comp Winners

February 2nd, 2012 in Case Competition, Graduate Students, News, Students

1st place team to compete in International Tech Strategy Case Competition in March

During the weekend of January 28-29, 12 teams of Boston University School of Management students participated in the School’s Internal Tech Strategy Case Competition.

Congratulations to the winners

First-place-case-comp-2012

1st Place, Team 12:

Mike Rabinovich (MBA ’12)
Mikhail Gurevich (MBA ’12)
John Bry (MBA ’12)
Kevin Harder (MS-MBA ’12)

Second-place-case-comp-2012 

2nd Place, Team 3:

Corey Mathis (MBA ’12)
Carl Palme (MS-MBA ’12)
Elliot Deremer (MBA ’12)
Tchad Rogers (MS-MBA ’12)

Third-place-case-comp-2012 

 

3rd Place, Team 7:

Lara Wasowski (MS-MBA ’13)
Shan Guo (MBA ’13)
Sam Cecala (MBA ’13)
Anshuman Mirani (MBA ’13)

The 1st place team, Team 12, will move on to compete against 15 other schools in the Seventh Annual International Tech Strategy Case Competition March 29-31, 2012, hosted by Boston University School of Management in collaboration with Ericsson.

The competition recognizes the best up-and-coming MBA strategists who understand the transformative power of IT in business, and enables student teams to showcase their talents to top players in the technology and telecom fields.

For more information, please contact casecomp@management.bu.edu/.

Mathematical Finance Program’s Latest Statistics

January 6th, 2012 in Graduate Students, School, Students

MSMF By the Numbers

Class of 2013: For our newest MSMF Program class, graduating 2013, we welcomed 46 students from 11 countries. By citizenship, the statistics are:

  • 2% Canada
  • 2% Ghana
  • 17% India
  • 2% Lebanon
  • 2% Morocco
  • 22% China
  • 7% South Korea
  • 2% Taiwan
  • 4% Turkey
  • 37% USA
  • 2% Vietnam

Class of 2012: To celebrate our first graduating class of the new 1 ½-year program configuration (as MSMF used to be a single-year program), we hosted a graduation brunch on Friday, December 9, 2011, featuring accolades and the presentation “A Look Back at the Class of 2012.”

The class of 2012 did an exceptional job completing internships during the summer of 2011.  Forty-four out of 46 students, 96% of the class, participated in this highly practical industry training.

Mathematical Finance Program 2011 Events Recap and Slideshow

January 6th, 2012 in Graduate Students, MSMF, School, Students

Mathematical Finance Program 2011 Events SlideshowDuring the fall 2011 semester, the Mathematical Finance Program held a series of social events, including our Power of Ten celebration and conference, a speaker series, and our annual holiday party for first- and second-year students. The program also hosted various social gatherings such as Pub Nights at the BU Pub and Cornwall’s and trivia night at The White Horse in Allston. Get more details below, including a slideshow with pictures from these events.

The Power of Ten: Math Finance Anniversary Celebration and Conference

Saturday October 1, 2011

This event, held at Boston University School of Management, was a huge success, drawing approximately 150 Math Finance students, Finance faculty, and BU community members. The day included:

Lunch for alumni

Conference and Panel of Speakers:

“Chasing Bernie Madoff”: Harry Markopolos, Independent Financial Fraud Investigator and Bernie Madoff whistleblower

“A Reflection of Financial Crisis”: David Ye, Chief Risk Officer for State Street Global Markets

“A New Measure of Systemic Risk: Applications for Investors and Regulators”: Mark Kritzman, President and Chief Investment Officer of Windham Capital Management

Mathematical Finance Alumni Career Panel:

  • Alex Brill, (MSMF ’01), CEO, Matrix Global Advisors; Research Fellow, American Enterprise Institute
  • Nidhi Azar (MSMF ’01), Risk Manager, Fixed Income Credit, Barclays Capital
  • Brandon Farr (MSMF ’04), Vice President, Investment Risk Management State Street Global Advisors
  • Cel Kulasekaran (MSMF ’04), Senior Research Associate, Windham Capital Management
  • Leon Zhang (MSMF ’07), Financial Risk Manager, Everbright Securities, Co, Ltd.
  • Christopher Glynn (MSMF ’09), Jr. Quantitative Research Analyst, Boston Advisors
  • Olesya Shubov (MSMF ’09), Assistant Vice President, Strategy Advisory Group, Jennison Associates

Program Reception, School of Management Atrium

Alumni Celebratory Dinner, Trustees’ Lounge

See pictures from this event in our slideshow.

MF Program 2011 Speaker Series

  • November 7, 2011:
Dmitry Kiselyov, CFA
Manager, Complex Securities Group,
Ernst & Young, LLP, “Valuation of Credit Instruments”*
  • October 24, 2011:
Simon Tuck,
Director, Catastrophe Management,
Liberty Mutual, “Catastrophe Insurance: Quantitative approach”*
  • October 7, 2011: Kishore Karunakaran, President and Chief Operating Officer, FFCM LLC, “Market Neutral ETFs and Their Applications
  • September 23, 2011: Dragan Skoko, Director, Trading, Batterymarch Financial Management, Inc., “The Anatomy of a Buyside Trading Desk.” This talk was followed by a reception.
  • August 31, 2011: Crystal Fantry, Senior Educational Outreach Specialist, Wolfram Research, “Introduction to Mathematica”
  • August 3, 2011: Francesco Pasquariello, Sales Representative, Bloomberg, “Introduction to Macro Tools and Single Security Analysis”
  • May 3, 2011:
Tarek Eldin,
Head of Quantitative Research,
Geode Capital Management,
 “Quantitative Analysis for Asset Management”*
  • April 28, 2011:
Matthew Appel, CFA,
Vice President, Risk Services,
State Street, “Investment Analytics”*

*Talk arranged by Kateryna Kruzement-Prykhodko (MSMF, January 2012)

Get more recent MF news and pictures in the news story “Mathematical Finance Program’s Latest Statistics

HSMP Alumni Group Mentoring Program

December 15th, 2011 in Alumni, Career Related, Graduate Students, Health Sector, HSMP

By Natalie Truesdell (MBA, MPH ‘07) and Naomi Muse (MBA ’07)

The Health Sector Management Alumni Mentorship program was developed in the fall of 2011 in response both to the alumni board’s interest in further connecting with students and to feedback from a broad alumni survey indicating that graduates were interested in structured mentorship opportunities. The program was developed as a group mentoring model pairing a single alumnus with several students to facilitate mutual learning and maximize the alumni-matching process.

The program spans six months, from October through April of each academic year. Students and mentors are matched based on career interests, dual-degree status, and students’ specific areas of desired learning. Students and mentors coordinate their own schedules with the expectation that the groups will meet once a month over the six-month period.

This month, we are collecting mid-point feedback from student and mentors that will be used to further develop and improve the program. Thus far, we have received very positive comments from students. Below are examples from two students. The first is a “career switcher” and thus highly eager to have the opportunity to develop a relationship with someone in the health sector field:

“It has been invaluable to be in contact with a professional who has been through the same program I am in now, especially as a PEMBA and career switcher. My mentor has been really great at connecting me with other alumni and has opened me up to a number of career options.”

Another student explains,

“I’ve been able to bring what I’ve learned to the classroom, and ask questions of my mentor about how the concepts I am learning apply in the ‘real world.’  I have found that my classmates in other disciplines—finance, for example—are jealous of the alumni mentorship opportunity I have had.”

Program Overview:

  • Number of students in the program: 29
  • Number of alumni mentors: 10
  • Alumni class years represented: 1995- 2011
  • Health sector fields represented and number of participating alumni in each field:
    • Biotechology: 1
    • Pharma: 1
    • Medical devices: 1
    • Consulting: 3
    • Health care delivery: 4
    • Job positions and companies of participating alumni:
      • Sales, New England Area Account Manager, BioSero, LLC
      • Manager, ECG Management Consultants
      • CEO, Propel Careers
      • TeleHealth and TeleMedicine Program Manager, Children’s Hospital Boston
      • Consultant, PricewaterhouseCoopers
      • Vice President of Operations, post acquisition integration, Beacon Health Strategies
      • Health Industries Associate, PricewaterhouseCoopers
      • Product Manager, Philips Healthcare, (looking at product marketing, strategy, roadmaps and business development)
      • Advisory Manager, PricewaterhouseCoopers
      • Director of Planning, Covenant Health Systems

Boston University MBA Team Wins NAAMBA Global Case Competition

October 21st, 2011 in Graduate Students, News, Students

Roman Sverdlov (MBA '12), Sabrina Grijalva Wells (MBA '12), and Sidharth Ramsinghaney (MBA '12)

Roman Sverdlov (MBA '12), Sabrina Grijalva Wells (MBA '12), and Sidharth Ramsinghaney (MBA '12)

A team of Boston University School of Management MBA students swept the finals in the National Association of Asian MBAs (NAAMBA) Global Case Competition on September 9, 2011, in New York.

Congratulations to team leader Roman Sverdlov (MBA ’12) and his colleagues Sabrina Grijalva Wells (MBA ’12), and Sidharth Ramsinghaney (MBA ’12), who competed against finalists from Purdue, Syracuse University, and the University of Southern California. Each group presented a marketing plan to position Singapore as an ideal career destination to young Asian professionals in the US.

The winning Boston University team will receive a trip to Singapore to examine the dynamics of doing business in Asia through networking opportunities with senior management at multinational companies.

NAAMBA is a leading non-profit professional organization dedicated to cultivating global Asian leaders.  According to Jino Ahn, founder and president of NAAMBA, “The Global MBA Case Competition is an opportunity for NAAMBA members to exhibit and refine their business skills under pressure, which will help them tremendously as they pursue career opportunities.”

Tze Min Lim, Area Director at the competition’s sponsor, Contact Singapore, added, “Asia has become a hub for business and finance, and Singapore is at the epicenter with more than 7,000 multinational companies. As businesses continue to expand into Asia, experience and knowledge of this region is invaluable. The Global MBA Case Competition gives students the chance to examine how they can best position themselves to seize career and business opportunities in Asia.”

Public Nonprofit Program Students on their Summer Internships

October 21st, 2011 in Graduate Students, Social Impact, Students

Left Photo: Anya Thomas (far left) with Dominique Chambless (MPH 2012), and Meg Meyer (MBA/MPH 2012); Right Photo: Steph Bloch with Mass. Governor Deval Patrick, and Uri Feld (former BU PNP student)

Left Photo: Anya Thomas (far left) with Dominique Chambless (MPH 2012), and Meg Meyer (MBA/MPH 2012); Right Photo: Steph Bloch with Mass. Governor Deval Patrick, and Uri Feld (former BU PNP student)

Anya Thomas (MBA 2012, Public and Nonprofit Management)
Summer 2011 Vestergaard Frandsen (VF) Intern

“Your goal is to change Ghana’s water policy.”  When my Boston University teammates and I secured an internship with Vestergaard Frandsen (VF), we had no idea that we would get to work on a presentation that has the potential to impact the lives of millions of Ghanaians.  Even though VF is not a non-profit, it is a social enterprise focused on “humanitarian entrepreneurship.”  This small company invents technologies that promote health through out the developing world.  Its most famous product is a bed net that protects people from mosquitoes that carry malaria.  Now VF has started to tackle the international water crisis with an extremely effective membrane water filter.

” This internship allowed my teammates and I to participate in a fascinating public-private partnership.”

This internship allowed my teammates and I to participate in a fascinating public-private partnership.  As VF interns we got to meet with Ghanaian officials in the water sector, multilaterals such as the World Bank and UNICEF, as well as local NGOs.  Together these public and private organizations are trying to save millions of lives. As our research is came to a close, we became more convinced than ever that filters and other types of household water treatment are crucial components of a comprehensive water and sanitation strategy for any developing country.

Our presentation is being used by VF to help the Ghanaian government and various development partners realize that household water treatment is the interim solution they need.  This experience has opened my eyes to so many new areas.  Now I understand the huge affect water quality has on health and economics, and I am inspired by how a small innovative company can affect policy change and promote the health of a whole nation.

Steph Bloch (MBA Dec 2011, Public and Nonprofit Management)
Summer 2011 Rappaport Fellow, Rappaport Institute and Harvard Kennedy School of Public Policy

As a Rappaport Fellow for the summer of 2011, I was placed in Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s Office.  I was charged with educating entrepreneurs about the permitting process for start-up small businesses  through a website launch, the initiation of a collateral series, and a TV segment.  My goal was to help create a comprehensive package for new business owners to access the information they need from all city departments, in order to navigate the permitting process.

My internship gave me the chance to interact with many of Boston’s top policymakers and learn from them about how they keep the city running.  One of the best experiences was riding on a police boat to visit a summer camp on one of Boston’s Harbor Islands for Boston’s underprivileged youths.  But day in and day out, working at the Mayor’s Office has made for an excellent summer.  Everyone is here because they want to do good for the city.  Being surrounded by intelligent people who want to do right by the public is invigorating.

” Maybe the most important thing I learned from the experience was to think about the short term in balance with the long term.”

Maybe the most important thing I learned from the experience was to think about the short term in balance with the long term.  If left to my own devices, as a business student, I would have done research, written proposals, made plans, and nothing tangible would have come to fruition. Being here, I realize that since everything is about the people of Boston, you have to give the people signs that you care about them by going for some shorter term solutions they can relate to and feel good about. The thing is that you’re always working for the long-term greater good, but sometimes you have to help people be proud of their city now.

A Student’s Account of the India Field Seminar

October 21st, 2011 in Graduate Students, Health Sector, School, Social Impact, Students

HSMP India Seminar 2

Deedar Samant, a 2011 alumnus of the Health Sector Management program at the School of Management, shares his experience attending the India Field Seminar as a second-year MBA student.

Earlier this year, 20 students from Boston University School of Management, accompanied by two faculty members, visited three of India’s biggest and most rapidly developing cities: Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore. Our journey began in the wintry, cold-gripped capital city of Delhi.  For four days we absorbed information and sights in this city rich with historic significance and landmarks, from the Mughals to India’s independence struggle with the British Raj.

Our visit to All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) was particularly interesting. Enjoying the good fortune of being located in the nation’s capital, AIIMS is backed by a surprisingly huge budget for a government hospital, which enables it to provide the populous with state-of-the-art services ranging from preventive to the best diagnostic and surgical services offered anywhere in the world. It was fascinating to observe the workings of the emergency department, which looked extremely busy even though the administrator accompanying us assured us that it was a relatively “light” day.

“India is a fascinating country with marked differences in languages, cultural practices, health care needs, and provisions and access to these services.”

Next, our encounters with two individuals on the opposite side of the battle, developing over drug patent protection rights, introduced us to the world of generic medicines and the economic and cultural issues linked with the struggle.

Next on our travel map was the city of Mumbai (formerly Bombay), undoubtedly the economic, fashion, entertainment, and street-food capital of India. To describe Mumbai in a single sentence, it is the perfect blend of New York and Los Angeles with an abundant cultural diversity. Our meeting with the head of the preventive medicine department of one of the largest government hospitals in Mumbai, and subsequent visit to the Dharavi urban health center, were wonderful experiences. The center (part of the government hospital system) provides absolute free preventive and medical services to the slum of Dharavi, with a population of more than a million.

“A visit to generic drug manufacturing firms strengthened our understanding of the market strategies applied by these companies in battling the multinational corporations in the highly lucrative Indian pharmaceutical market.”

A visit to the generic drug manufacturing firms of Glenmark and Cipla strengthened our understanding of the market strategies applied by these firms in battling the multinational corporations in the highly lucrative Indian pharmaceutical market.

Our last stop on the seminar brought us to the technology capital of India, Bangalore. A visit to Narayana Hrudayalaya (a cardiac care center) and an encounter with its founder, Dr Devi Shetty, was very rewarding. Our conversation with Dr Shetty made us realize the clarity and dedication of his vision in bringing quality medical services to the low income population at a fraction of the cost incurred by providers in the western world. The level of operating efficiency and progress achieved through simple, effective, evidence-based medical practices, prompted some of our team members to ask Dr Shetty for internships at his institute to discover more details on the organizations operating strategies and expansion initiatives.

“Indians have definitely broken the first set of codes unlocking the doors into the world of quality health care to the masses at highly affordable prices and will be a great resource of lessons-learned for the health care institutions in the US. “

India is a fascinating country with marked differences in languages, cultural practices, health care needs, and provisions and access to these services. The pace of development and ideation is tremendous but the infrastructure needed to sustain these processes is not keeping pace. There is a sincere effort on part of the government, and national as well as international private parties, to develop the infrastructure to ensure rapid and organized progress of the health care system. However, one fact prominently stands out: Indians have definitely broken the first set of codes unlocking the doors into the world of quality health care to the masses at highly affordable prices and will be a great resource of lessons-learned for the health care institutions here in the United States.

First-Year MBA’s Advance to Final Round of NAAMBA Global Case Competition

August 30th, 2011 in Graduate Students, News, Students

From left: Sidharth Ramsinghaney, Sabrina Grijalva, Roman Sverdlov

From left: Sidharth Ramsinghaney, Sabrina Grijalva, Roman Sverdlov

A team of Boston University School of Management first-year MBA students will advance to the final round of the NAAMBA Global Case Competition after placing in the top four during last week’s qualifying round. Finalists were announced on July 31, 2011.

Members of the BU team, including Roman Sverdlov (team leader), Sabrina Grijalva Wells, and Sidharth Ramsinghaney presented a case study suggesting ways in which companies operating in Asia can compete for and attract the best talent from around the world.

The BU team, along with teams from Perdue, Syracuse University, and the University of Northern California, will be provided with a stipend and full registration to attend the Third Annual Leadership Conference and Exposition in New York on September 9, 2011, where they will present the final topic to the judging panel. The winning team will receive a trip to Singapore to more closely examine the rise of Asia and the dynamics of doing business there.

The National Association of Asian MBAs (NAAMBA), a leading non-profit professional organization dedicated to cultivating global Asian leaders, hosts the competition. According to Jino Ahn, founder and president of NAAMBA, “The Global MBA Case Competition is an opportunity for NAAMBA members to exhibit and refine their business skills under pressure, which will help them tremendously as they pursue career opportunities.”

Tze Min Lim, Area Director at Contact Singapore, added, “Asia has become a hub for business and finance, and Singapore is at the epicenter with more than 7,000 multinational companies. As businesses continue to expand into Asia, experience and knowledge of this region is invaluable. The Global MBA Case Competition gives students the chance to examine how they can best position themselves to seize career and business opportunities in Asia.”

Mathematical Finance Program News & Highlights: Spring/Summer 2011

July 27th, 2011 in Graduate Students, School, Students

 

Power of Ten Math Finance Anniversary Celebration: Saturday, October 1, 2011! 

A Day of Reunion, Networking, Merriment, and More

Please save the date for our 10 Year Anniversary Alumni Event, which has been changed to Saturday, October 1st, 2011, at Boston University School of Management.  Program alumni, faculty, and staff will gather for an all-day event to celebrate the program, reconnect with old friends, and network with new ones.

A mailed invitation with more details is forthcoming to all MF Program alumni.  If we do not have your mailing address on file, please send it to tjensen@bu.edu. Emailed invitations will also be sent.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Application Number Rise by Almost 35%

Application numbers for the Masters in Mathematical Finance Program have once more been on the rise, up almost 35% this year.  For the Fall 2010 semester, the program received applications from 773 candidates; for Fall 2011, the number jumped to 1,041.

Slideshow & Event Recap from the MF Program’s Spring 2011 Semester

Slideshow from MF 2011 Alumni Event

Click to see the full slideshow, as well as details about our Spring 2011 alumni and student events, including a party at Scoozi, Boston Harbor boat cruise, Karaoke night, and more.

Boston University MBAs Sweep Regional Hult Challenge

July 27th, 2011 in Graduate Students, Students

Left to Right: Catherine Liang, Ravi Kolipaka, Jane Bulnes-Fowles, Donna Tsui (Hult student volunteer), Matthew K. Fox, and Toni Ann Louie

Left to Right: Catherine Liang, Ravi Kolipaka, Jane Bulnes-Fowles, Donna Tsui (Hult student volunteer), Matthew K. Fox, and Toni Ann Louie

On March 5, 2011, five Boston University MBA students swept the regional portion of the 2nd Annual Hult Global Case Challenge, beating out teams from MIT, Harvard, Tufts, Cornell, Columbia, and other schools.

Similar regional competitions took place on the same day in San Francisco, London, Dubai, and Shanghai.  The winners of these competitions joined the Boston University team to compete in the Global Final of the challenge on April 28, when a group from Cambridge University walked away with the $1 million prize.

The Boston University team, all members of the Part-Time MBA Program (PEMBA) who expect to graduate in 2012, included the following students from diverse locations and professional backgrounds, spanning bio/pharma, public health research, software development, nonprofit, and retail energy supply:

  • Matthew K. Fox (Edwards, New York)
  • Ravi Kolipaka (Hyderabad, India)
  • Catherine Liang (Monroeville, Pennsylvania)
  • Toni Ann Louie (New York, New York)
  • Jane Bulnes-Fowles (Palo Alto, California)

As Hult explained in a press release, this year’s challenge gathered “students from the world’s top schools to focus on developing solutions to accelerate clean water access and sanitation around the world….Global judges included Gary White, Executive Director and Co-Founder of Water.org; George Fisher, Former CEO of Kodak and current senior advisor of private equity powerhouse KKR; Bruce Mosler, Co-Chairman of Cushman & Wakefield; Peter Thum, Co-Founder of Ethos Water and a Vice President at Starbucks; Gary Hattem, President of the Deutsche Bank Foundation; and Premal Shah, a leading social entrepreneur and president of Kiva.org.”

“Boston University School of Management provided us with one main attribute that helped our success in the Boston regional: diversity of perspective.”

–BU MBA student Ravi Kolipaka

Says Boston University team leader Matthew K. Fox, “We selected our team so that it consisted of people who could view the case from different angles. Our backgrounds are highly diverse, so, as a team, we continually allowed each other to think in unusual ways, to brainstorm solutions freely, and to be respectful of all the ideas brought to the table.”

Reflecting on how the BU MBA experience helped prepare their team for such a strong showing, Ravi Kolipaka explains, “Boston University School of Management provided us with one main attribute that helped our success in the Boston regional: diversity of perspective.”

“We were a strong team because we leaned on each other to inspire one another. We saw similarities in not only the three other teams in the final but throughout the competition.”

–BU MBA student Jane Bulnes-Fowles

Adds fellow BU competitor Catherine Liang, “The diverse student body at the School of Management, combined with the case-based learning approach and team projects, has really taught us to think through problems in a multi-disciplinary way.”

“We also gained a great respect for the power of strong teams,” says Jane Bulnes-Fowles.  “We were a strong team because we leaned on each other to inspire one another.  We saw similarities in not only the three other teams in the final but throughout the competition. They were able to approach the complex problem with thought-provoking and innovative ideas and solutions.”

Adds team member Toni Ann Louie, “Specific courses such as Global Sustainability, IT Strategies, and the Non-Profit Accounting class in the Public & Nonprofit MBA program, were also especially helpful in the development of our idea.  These courses introduced us to new and innovative business models and helped us analyze social trends happening now throughout the established and developing world.”