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Undergraduate Courses

Corp Resp & Eth

SMG IS 171 (4 credits)

Introduction to Information Systems

SMG IS 223 (4 credits)

Provides students with an understanding of the important role that information and information technology play in supporting the effective operation and management of business. Elaborates on the themes of "place to space" and the implications for business of the digital enterprise. Focuses on learning IS concepts in the context of application to real business problems.

Intro Info Syst

SMG IS 323 (4 credits)

This course description is currently under construction.

Managing Information Security

SMG IS 428 (4 credits)

Combines technical and business approaches to the management of information. It will address technical issues such as cryptography, intrusion detection, and firewalls along with managerial ideas such as overall security policies, managing uncertainty and risk, and organization factors. We will examine different aspects of computer security such as password, virus protection, and managing computer security in dynamic environments. Topics will also include network security and how to secure wireless application and services. These technical details will be placed in a business context. The class will have a practical focus as we examine current "best practices" in area. There will be several guest speakers in the security area. This will be a project-oriented class and students will present their research projects during the last several classes. 4 cr.

Implementing Information Systems Solutions

SMG IS 434 (4 credits)

Examines best practices for successfully implementing Information Systems solutions. Formulates the appropriate governance, architecture, and planning required for successful IS implementation, and provides the student with hands- on software training and approaches for successful IS implementation. Examines issues related to IS outsourcing including the development of international service level agreements, the human impact of outsourcing, and the legal and social implications of outsourcing. Upon completion of this course students will master the complex methods and practices to frame a problem, and propose an actionable solution, that would be expected from top consultants and business executives.

Managing Data Resources

SMG IS 465 (4 credits)

Required for Management Information Systems concentrators. Provides a practical and theoretical introduction to data management focusing on the use of relational database technology and SQL to manage an organization's data and information. Introduces recent topics such as data warehouses and Web databases. Includes a project to design and implement a relational database to manage an organization's data. 4 cr.

Networking and Data Communications

SMG IS 467 (4 credits)

Required for Management Information Systems concentrators. Introduces technologies, policies, and management and organizational concepts critical to understanding the role of data communications in a rapidly changing business and social environment. The materials focus on: the data communications industry; core technologies including mobile technology and the wireless Internet; management and use of communications technologies; policies; and organizational issues.

Designing Information Systems

SMG IS 469 (4 credits)

Required for Management Information Systems concentrators. Studies the process of designing and implementing management information systems. Students will learn to analyze organizational information requirements, develop specifications for information systems, manage systems development projects, and understand implementation issues. Key implementation concepts that affect management decisions will be discussed, and reenforced with programming examples. Design support tools will be used to support the design process. Includes a project to design an information system.

Electronic Commerce

SMG IS 472 (4 credits)

The Internet has brought about significant change in the way business is conducted. The rules and business models, however, for the new economy are still in their infancy. This course provides a grounding in the concepts of electronic commerce, and then moves to an examination of the emergent and emerging business models. The IT/IS infrastructure that supports these various business models is addressed, particularly architecting systems including privacy and security issues.

Information Products: Applied Economics and Strategy

SMG IS 474 (4 credits)

This course offers three modules to develop critical skills in the fast-moving information economy. These are (1) information product design, (2) managing information for competitive advantage, and (3) ethical uses of information. The first module focuses on how to price and value information. We show when it should be free, when it should be expensive, and how to complement other resources. The second module then moves to information business models including both for-profit and open-source models. We cover use as a strategic weapon of market foreclosure and key elements of property rights in information. The third module examines ethical uses of information, privacy concerns, and your rights and responsibilities as an information consumer.

Innovating with Information Technology

SMG IS 479 (4 credits)

Surveys the organizational implementation, uses, and impacts of advanced information technology including decision support systems, management support systems, and expert systems. Includes a group project to design and develop a decision support system.

Directed Study: Management Information Systems

SMG IS 498 (Var credits)

Directed study in Management Information Systems. 2 or 4 cr. Application available on Undergraduate Program website.

Graduate Courses

Mgn Ntwrkd Sys

GSM IS 705 (2 credits)

System Design for Business Networks

GSM IS 706 (3 credits)

Provides a comprehensive review of the theory and practice of Information Systems Analysis and Design. Students explore the tools and techniques associated with a process, a data-oriented, and an object-oriented view of systems design and evaluate the implications of the emerging technologies of computer-aided software design.

Systems Architecture

GSM IS 707 (3 credits)

Focuses on Operating Systems for workstations and mainframes with emphasis on the operating system as both a provider of service and manager of resources. It includes discussions and cases in the management of technology and technical people as well as personal issues professionals and managers.

IT Strategies for a Networked Economy

GSM IS 710 (3 credits)

This case-based course demonstrates the role that information technology plays in shaping business strategy and business models. It provides an overview of the key technologies that are important in today's business environment and introduces organization and management concepts relating to the information technology function. The course also illustrates the relationships between organizational performance and the ability to leverage knowledge assets.

IT Strategies for a Networked Economy

GSM IS 711 (4 credits)

This case-based course demonstrates the role that information technology plays in shaping business strategy and business models. It provides an overview of the key technologies that are important in today's business environment and introduces organization and management concepts relating to the information technology function. The course also illustrates the relationships between organizational performance and the ability to leverage knowledge assets.

Mastering IT Strategy

GSM IS 714 (3 credits)

This is a capstone course to integrate the key concepts and approaches to managing IT in modern corporations. Using a set of leading-edge case examples, frameworks, the students will have an opportunity to understand how IT strategy supports current business models while shaping tomorrow's business models. Students will master the intricate challenges of placing IT at the core of modern enterprises. They will have an opportunity to apply their learnings to a company of their choice through a course project.

IT Applications in Management

GSM IS 717 (3 credits)

The objective of this course is to provide an introduction to IT/IS technologies and to provide a hands-on, tutorial-driven, application development experience. The course will be divided into two sessions on each day. For three days, the first session will offer a strategic application of a technology, and the second session, will provide an overview of the technological components that enable this technology. Technologies to be discussed include enterprise systems applications such as ERP systems, SCM systems, and CRM systems. The other two days of the course will focus on using a programming environment to develop one or two simple applications. The "instructional" half of the day will cover the key constructs and components of the programming environment and the second half will be a hand-on tutorial on the application of the concepts covered.

Platforms and Information Markets

GSM IS 827 (3 credits)

To thrive in modern economies, managers, entrepreneurs and investors need a thorough understanding of business platforms. Thousands of firms, from Facebook to Salesforce, now operate as open ecosystems that match buyers and sellers, gain value and market share from network effects, and harness their users to innovate. Drawing on cases from social media, entrepreneurship, enterprise software, mobile services, healthcare, and consumer products, students will analyze and learn to negotiate platform startup, convert existing businesses, and make vital decisions on issues of openness, cannibalization, and competition. Students will interact with execs of major firms such as Cisco and SAP and with startups. They will learn to apply concepts from two sided networks, industrial organization, information asymmetry, pricing, intellectual property, and game theory to real problems. Known worldwide for his work on network business models, Professor Van Alstyne provides students with the tools to leverage key principles into hands-on creation and management of real-world platforms.

Managing Information Security

GSM IS 828 (3 credits)

This MBA elective (also open to undergraduates) will combine a technical and business approach to the management of information. It will address technical issues such as cryptography, intrusion detection and firewalls along with managerial ideas such as overall security policies, managing uncertainty and risk and organization factors. We will examine different aspects of computer security such as passwords, virus protection and managing computer security in dynamic environments. Topics will also include network security and how to secure wireless application and services. These technical details will be placed in a business context. The class will have a practical focus as we examine current best practices. There well be several guest speakers in the security area. This will be a project oriented class and students will present their research projects during the last several classes.

Business Transformation

GSM IS 829 (3 credits)

Every business sector is undergoing profound changes partly due to the recent financial crisis but also due to the impact of information technology. This course allows MBA students a chance to engage with how IT impacts business operations in a strategic way. The distinctive feature of this course is that we will have real-life cases from companies and the students will have an opportunity to present their analysis and recommendations to corporate executives. We will use latest cases and articles as well as review and work with leading-edge practice from companies. Reserved for MBA students only.

Competing in Business Networks

GSM IS 830 (3 credits)

Business strategy has been profoundly affected by the pervasive connectivity enabled by the internet, modern communications and the explosion of connected devices. Add to this the emergence of intelligent sensor technologies such as Mote, RFID and many forms of nano technologies, the business strategists of today have the opportunity to fundamentally transform the nature of the modern business model. This course uses the design concepts of platforms to examine the characteristics of and the implementation issues associated with the design and deployment of these new business models. The course is divided into three parts. First, the concept of business capabilities and the design logic of platforms will be explored. These concepts will be examined from both an economic perspective and from the perspective of designing adaptive business processes. Second, the course will use case studies to explore how these concepts have been applied across multiple industries including, retail, healthcare, transportation, manufacturing and a variety of service contexts. Finally, the implementation and leadership issues associated with the deployment of these concepts will be discussed using case studies and through dialogue with invited speakers.

Advanced Topics in IT Strategy

GSM IS 831 (3 credits)

This course will build upon the concepts and frameworks discussed in IS 714. Students will choose a sector and company as a focal point to develop and write a strategic position paper that explores a significant business opportunity. The paper will define the business opportunity and present original research and analysis of this opportunity in support of the recommendations and conclusions. Each paper will been reviewed and evaluated by both a professor and a designated business executive. Class sessions will involve open and constructive discussions each students? work progress addressing issues such as core value proposition, methodologies used in the analysis and feedback on recommendations. Industry guest speakers will be used stimulate ideas and to provide a means to obtain meaningful feedback. Single or coauthored papers will be completed no later than April 15, 2011.

Networks and Social Media

GSM IS 832 (3 credits)

As the penetration of online and mobile technologies continues to advance, instant messaging, mobile phone communication, micro-blogs, and online social networks are shaping how we interact with the world and each other. The explosion of data surrounding these interactions is a powerful microscope that permits research into behaviors and their social and economic outcomes at an unprecedented scale and level of detail orders of magnitude greater than what was previously possible. The emerging field of network science describes these interconnections and gives us tools to understand their importance to our natural, social and business environments. This course will introduce the theory and practice of network science and cover numerous applications in the realms of business, health and politics. We will explore questions such as: How can firms and policy makers harness the power of social media? How can we promote or discourage population level change? How do behavioral contagions form and become viral? What is the value of a tweet? Topics may include: network structure and dynamics; social network analysis; weak and strong ties; structural holes; homophily; community structure; information propagation and cascades in networks; the dynamics of influence; social and behavioral contagions; word of mouth; viral product design; strategic competition; crowdsourcing; incentives and gamification; and others.

Emerging Perspectives and Synthesis

GSM IS 837 (3 credits)

This course is intended to serve two purposes--(a) an opportunity to expose students to leading-edge faculty research that has not yet been integrated into the Master's curriculum; and (b) allow students to develop a synthesis of how technology and business domains are interwoven in the transition from an industrial age to a post-industrial age with pervasive impacts of information technology and systems. Students will be exposed to a set of leading-edge ideas by SMG faculty members as well as guest lectures and discussions. Each student will have an opportunity to reflect on these ideas by developing a paper on a chosen topic that serves to maximize learning in the program. We believe that this one-week intensive course (based on some of our experiences with a program for IBM Corporation) will be a useful synthesis of leading-edge ideas for the MS-MBA students.

Advanced Business Analytics: Data Mining

GSM IS 841 (3 credits)

The widespread proliferation of IT-influenced economic activity leaves behind a rich trail of micro-level data about consumer, supplier and competitor preferences. This has led to the emergence of a new form of competition based on the extensive use of analytics, experimentation, and fact-based decision making. In virtually every industry the competitive strategies organizations are employing today rely extensively on data analysis to predict the consequences of alternative courses of action, and to guide executive decision making. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the concepts, methods and processes of business analytics. We will learn how to obtain and draw business inferences from data by asking the right questions and using the appropriate tools. Topics to be covered include data preparation, data visualization, data mining, text mining, recommender systems as well as the overall process of using analytics to solve business problems, its organizational implications and pitfalls. Students will work with real world business data and analytics software. Where possible cases will used to motivate the topic being covered. Prior courses in data management and statistics will be helpful but not required.

Practicing IT Strategy, Management and Delivery

GSM IS 854 (3 credits)

For future business leaders who want to understand, influence and leverage technology investments more effectively. The course provides effective strategies, pragmatic options, and leading practice alternatives for linking Business and Technology Strategies, defining effective governance and organization models, and successfully delivering new technology innovation. Students will master the complex methods and practices needed to frame a problem and propose an actionable solution that would be expected from future Business Executives and Technology Managers. Students will master the complex methods and practices to frame a problem and propose an actionable solution that would be expected from Business Executives (e.g., CEO, Marketing Executive, CIO, CFO) and Technology Executives (e.g., Product Manager, Consultant, Program Manager, Sales).

Digital Transformation: Immersive Interactions and Insights at Silicon Valley

GSM IS 855 (3 credits)

This course will be a one week intensive held in Silicon Valley. The course is designed to achieve two objectives. First, to develop an appreciation for the role of Silicon Valley in Digital Innovation and, secondly, to examine how digital innovations are impacting key shifts in specific sectors. This year, the course will focus on three sectors; Healthcare, Energy and Digital Content/education/media. Students will be placed into teams and be expected to develop specific insights as the basis to engage in interactions with corporate executives, alumni and follow classmates. Teams will also visit leading companies involved in each sector and develop and present their team's perspective on key digital trends and leadership challenges for their sector.

Designing Systems for Data Management

GSM IS 883 (3 credits)

The first objective is to introduce the student the concept of design in information systems. Although the design concepts covered largely focus on data management, it will include high level systems design concepts as well. The second objective of this course is to introduce the student to the practical applications of databases and database management systems. The students will learn the fundamentals of data management starting with the basics of data design. The students will learn querying and managing the data in a database, defining the structures for storing data, and implementing business rules in relational databases using the Structured Query Language (SQL). The two objectives will tie in together as the students will be expected to integrate systems design with data design to design a prototype information system. This exercise will walk the students through the process of eliciting requirements, defining the scope, designing a restricted set of functions, designing the database, implementing the database, and explaining how restricted set of functions will use the data. The programming requirements will be very minimal. Besides the basics of data management, this course will also cover relevant ?in? topics in data management such as database security, data quality management, and data auditing (if time permits).

Technology Tools for e-Business

GSM IS 885 (3 credits)

Focuses on how to build and manipulate data structures in a typical hardware/software environment. Emphasis is on building structures that represent organizational entities so users can examine them. The role of the analyst/designer in this process requires sufficient understanding of the technology to be aware of the options available and of the costs and benefits of these options.

Dr Stdy:Inf Sys

GSM IS 888 (3 credits)

Telecommunications and Business Networks

GSM IS 889 (3 credits)

Examines the data communication hardware and software characteristics that are relevant to the applications software designer and presents a general overview of communications network design. Topics include issues in the design and use of both local area networks and wide area networks, the impact of communications technology on organizations and trends in the communications industry are studied.

Ds: Info Systms

GSM IS 898 (Var credits)

Ds: Info Systms

GSM IS 899 (Var credits)

Perspectives on Information, Organization and Strategy

GSM IS 910 (Var credits)

The focus of this course will be on information, how it is shared and assessed across a variety of actors and how value can be generated by it in organizational and market contexts. The perspectives on information will be anchored by two disciplinary positions: economics and organization theory. The goal of this will be to bring a strong disciplinary approach and contrast to information and apply to classic challenges for organization and strategy (markets). The course will consist of a variety of readings as well as guest speakers representing these perspectives. The output of the course will consist of short ?reaction? papers as well as a final paper where the students states perspective on information and apply it to the primary research question(s) that is driving their graduate studies. Open to all PhD students at Boston University. Also open to MBA students with faculty member's consent.

Information Economics

GSM IS 912 (4 credits)

This class will cover seminal works in the economics of information including the Nobel Prize winning ideas of Akerlof, Arrow, Spence, Stiglitz, and von Hayek. It will proceed through (i) concepts of information, its value and measurement (ii) search and choice under uncertainty (iii) signaling, screening, and how rational actors use information for private advantage (iii) how to price and package information goods (iv) how properties of information cause market failure (v) macroeconomic effects of information (vi) social and legal issues of owning information. Although primarily a theory class, it should be of interest to any student applying information economics in academic, commercial, or government policy contexts. Prerequisites are a graduate course in microeconomics and mathematics at the level of introductory calculus and statistics. Students will produce a major paper suitable for publication or inclusion in a thesis.

Topics in Information Systems Research

GSM IS 917 (4 credits)

In this class we will a carry out a wide-ranging exploration of the IS research literature, looking at some of the most influential publications in the field as well as emerging work. Through close reading and vigorous discussion we will seek to understand the important methods, debates, and domains of inquiry. Objectives: - Develop a familiarity with some of the most influential papers in the literature. - Get a sense of the field. - Practice close reading, critiquing, and scholarly debate. - Synthesize a range of literatures. - Think carefully about some of the key concepts which are at the heart of the IS field of inquiry.

Resrch Sem 2

GSM IS 919 (Var credits)

Ds:Info Systems

GSM IS 988 (Var credits)

Dr Sty:Info Sys

GSM IS 990 (4 credits)

Ds:Info Systems

GSM IS 996 (Var credits)

Ds:Info Systems

GSM IS 997 (Var credits)

Ds: Info Systms

GSM IS 998 (Var credits)

Ds: Info Systms

GSM IS 999 (Var credits)